43rd Ozark Quilt Fair

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our Ozark Quilt Fair held on the museum grounds every September has gone virtual for 2021. Many thanks to all the quilters and quilt lovers who have helped us keep the quilt fair going, even in the midst of these trying times.

If you’ve attended our quilt fair in the past, you know that a highlight of the event is live bluegrass music by Working Class Grass. Members of that band have now joined together as the Roving Gambler Band: Walter Shook, lead singer and guitar; Steve Flory, band director and mandolin; Tony Talley, baritone and Dobro; Christine Talley, singer and bass; Adam Hardcastle, banjo; and Tim Case, guitar.

We’re grateful to the band for providing four cuts from their Grass on the Backside of the Moon album for your listening pleasure as you view the quilt gallery.

Quilt Gallery

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our Ozark Quilt Fair held on the museum grounds every September has gone virtual for 2021. Many thanks to all the quilters and quilt lovers who have helped us keep the quilt fair going, even in the midst of these trying times.

If you’ve attended our quilt fair in the past, you know that a highlight of the event is live bluegrass music by Working Class Grass. Members of that band have now joined together as the Roving Gambler Band: Walter Shook, lead singer and guitar; Steve Flory, band director and mandolin; Tony Talley, baritone and Dobro; Christine Talley, singer and bass; Adam Hardcastle, banjo; and Tim Case, guitar.

We’re grateful to the band for providing four cuts from their Grass on the Backside of the Moon album for your listening pleasure as you view the quilt gallery.

Quilt on bed with various blue and gold patterned rectangles with white centers.

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Quilter: Marcia Connors

Entered by: Marcia Connors

Quilt Pattern: My Own

Category: Contemporary

History: Using up scraps!

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Quilter: Marcia Connors

Entered by: Marcia Connors

Quilt Pattern: My Own

Category: Contemporary

History: Using up scraps!

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Mary (Polly) Roberts Miller (1798 – 1880)

Entered by: Rogers Historical Museum

Quilt Pattern: Whig Rose Applique

Category: Antique, 1858

History: Made by Mary Miller in 1858 for her daughter Temperance Van Winkle. Temperance then gave the quilt to her daughter, Mary Steele, in 1902. Mary then handed the quilt down to her son and daughter-in-law, Guy and Lutie Steele in 1922. Around 1929 Lutie wrote a brief history on the quilt itself that reads “Made by Grandma Miller in 1858. Given to Grand Steele in 1902 from her mother, Temperance Van Winkle.” Temperance was the wife of Peter Van Winkle. The Van Winkles settled in Benton County in 1851 and owned a lumber mill near War Eagle. https://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/van-winkles-mill-5874/

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Quilter: Mary (Polly) Roberts Miller (1798 – 1880)

Entered by: Rogers Historical Museum

Quilt Pattern: Whig Rose Applique

Category: Antique, 1858

History: Made by Mary Miller in 1858 for her daughter Temperance Van Winkle. Temperance then gave the quilt to her daughter, Mary Steele, in 1902. Mary then handed the quilt down to her son and daughter-in-law, Guy and Lutie Steele in 1922. Around 1929 Lutie wrote a brief history on the quilt itself that reads “Made by Grandma Miller in 1858. Given to Grand Steele in 1902 from her mother, Temperance Van Winkle.” Temperance was the wife of Peter Van Winkle. The Van Winkles settled in Benton County in 1851 and owned a lumber mill near War Eagle. https://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/van-winkles-mill-5874/

Quilt squares containing the images of many t-shirts from Race for the Cure walks.

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Quilter: Beth Hopkins

Entered by: Beth Hopkins

Quilt Pattern: Race for the Cure T-Shirt Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: The quilt is made up of my Race For the Cure T-shirts. The sashing, border and most of the back is comprised of the Ford Warriors in Pink scarves distributed at each race. I walked each of these races as well as 2 more.

Quilt squares containing the images of many t-shirts from Race for the Cure walks.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Beth Hopkins

Entered by: Beth Hopkins

Quilt Pattern: Race for the Cure T-Shirt Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: The quilt is made up of my Race For the Cure T-shirts. The sashing, border and most of the back is comprised of the Ford Warriors in Pink scarves distributed at each race. I walked each of these races as well as 2 more.

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Quilter: Sheila

Entered by: Sheila Wright

Quilt Pattern: Twirling Star

Category: Contemporary

History: Multicolored twirling stars for my granddaughter Tenley.

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Quilter: Sheila

Entered by: Sheila Wright

Quilt Pattern: Twirling Star

Category: Contemporary

History: Multicolored twirling stars for my granddaughter Tenley.

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Quilter: Cheryl Hinson

Entered by: Cheryl Hinson

Quilt Pattern:  Village Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: Village Quilt was completed in 2004. I was born and raised in Fayetteville, Arkansas; my parents were from Greenwood, Arkansas. This is machine appliquéd, hand ribbon embroidery, and machine quilted. I love this quilt because it reminds me of all the small quaint hometowns with Victorian houses, small shops, and museums. I enjoy the art of quilting and learned how to quilt from my mother.

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Quilter: Cheryl Hinson

Entered by: Cheryl Hinson

Quilt Pattern: Village Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: Village Quilt was completed in 2004. I was born and raised in Fayetteville, Arkansas; my parents were from Greenwood, Arkansas. This is machine appliquéd, hand ribbon embroidery, and machine quilted. I love this quilt because it reminds me of all the small quaint hometowns with Victorian houses, small shops, and museums. I enjoy the art of quilting and learned how to quilt from my mother.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Makenzie Lauller

Entered by: Makenzie Lauller

Quilt Pattern: Lauller Baby Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: This my first baby quilt made entirely out of scrap fabric from my first ever quilting project. I didn’t have any instructions or pattern or assistance. I saw a photo on Pinterest and used what I had to make what you see before you.

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Quilter: Makenzie Lauller

Entered by: Makenzie Lauller

Quilt Pattern: Lauller Baby Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: This my first baby quilt made entirely out of scrap fabric from my first ever quilting project. I didn’t have any instructions or pattern or assistance. I saw a photo on Pinterest and used what I had to make what you see before you.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Jan Brown

Entered by: Jan Murray Brown

Quilt Pattern: Vignette Quilt of a Blessed Life

Category: Contemporary

History: It starts with the moon and the stars and everything else follows; that is the quilt and the story…and has become a celebration for my 75th birthday! In Feb 2021 I went to Quilt Con, a gathering of teachers and modern quilters from around the world…a virtual seminar this year. I signed up for a workshop given by a dynamic quilter, Heidi Parkes of Wisconsin, who encouraged her students to tell their quilt’s story in “vignettes”, emphasizing elements and principles of Art, “line, color, value” and even better, she encouraged creating vignettes with found fabrics and big-stitch quilting. Just what I wanted to experience! (HeidiParkes.com; Instagram: @HeidiParkes)

To represent the “sky” on a piece of muslin sheeting, I began my quilt with the blue hem-stitched line. I then arranged nine antique hand-pieced patched squares, stitched a moon, and expanded the stars to make them shine more. Soon I began to think about what I wanted to say with this quilt as these shapes and colors began to tell my life’s story. You’ll see a lot of BLUE because it is my all-time favorite color.

Now my mother was a Kansas farm girl and my dad was a NYC kid. They met during WW II at The Blue Moon in Wichita, Kansas. They married in November of 1945 and nine months later I began life as their oldest child in a family of nine kids in Wichita.

The state of Kansas where I was born has a motto: “To the Stars through Difficulty.” When I stitched it on an old dresser scarf just below the stars, the saying became a vignette. That beautiful uplifting motto let me know that we can shine through the most darkened times. All the vignettes here repeat that theme…finding “the stars” or “heaven through difficulty. Woven into the threads of time are responsibility, working hard, making do, use your hands, create. One can see the symmetry of wheat fields…a coffee cup…a feed sack that held 50 pounds of Kansas wheat in honor of my grandfather…a brocade butterly, a patch of buttons, French awning ticking, Dad’s bookkeeping paper…my husband’s denim shirt pocket. There is a lot to see and feel here in this quilt: the flat Kansas landscape, the joy of singing HU, how I found True Love in this lifetime.

All fabrics are cotton. Backing is a soft gray from Architexture “Wide Screen” by Carolyn Friedlander. Binding is a true-blue batik, hand-stitched. Batting is “Warm & Natural”, 100% cotton. Quilt is hand-pieced, hand-quilted, infinitely washable. Size: 71″x71″. Made with Love and Creative Imagination in a smoke-free, pet-free environment.
Jan Murray Brown
Springdale Arkansas
August, 2021

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Jan Brown

Entered by: Jan Murray Brown

Quilt Pattern: Vignette Quilt of a Blessed Life

Category: Contemporary

History:It starts with the moon and the stars and everything else follows; that is the quilt and the story…and has become a celebration for my 75th birthday! In Feb 2021 I went to Quilt Con, a gathering of teachers and modern quilters from around the world…a virtual seminar this year. I signed up for a workshop given by a dynamic quilter, Heidi Parkes of Wisconsin, who encouraged her students to tell their quilt’s story in “vignettes”, emphasizing elements and principles of Art, “line, color, value” and even better, she encouraged creating vignettes with found fabrics and big-stitch quilting. Just what I wanted to experience! (HeidiParkes.com; Instagram: @HeidiParkes)

To represent the “sky” on a piece of muslin sheeting, I began my quilt with the blue hem-stitched line. I then arranged nine antique hand-pieced patched squares, stitched a moon, and expanded the stars to make them shine more. Soon I began to think about what I wanted to say with this quilt as these shapes and colors began to tell my life’s story. You’ll see a lot of BLUE because it is my all-time favorite color.

Now my mother was a Kansas farm girl and my dad was a NYC kid. They met during WW II at The Blue Moon in Wichita, Kansas. They married in November of 1945 and nine months later I began life as their oldest child in a family of nine kids in Wichita.

The state of Kansas where I was born has a motto: “To the Stars through Difficulty.” When I stitched it on an old dresser scarf just below the stars, the saying became a vignette. That beautiful uplifting motto let me know that we can shine through the most darkened times. All the vignettes here repeat that theme…finding “the stars” or “heaven through difficulty. Woven into the threads of time are responsibility, working hard, making do, use your hands, create. One can see the symmetry of wheat fields…a coffee cup…a feed sack that held 50 pounds of Kansas wheat in honor of my grandfather…a brocade butterly, a patch of buttons, French awning ticking, Dad’s bookkeeping paper…my husband’s denim shirt pocket. There is a lot to see and feel here in this quilt: the flat Kansas landscape, the joy of singing HU, how I found True Love in this lifetime.

All fabrics are cotton. Backing is a soft gray from Architexture “Wide Screen” by Carolyn Friedlander. Binding is a true-blue batik, hand-stitched. Batting is “Warm & Natural”, 100% cotton. Quilt is hand-pieced, hand-quilted, infinitely washable. Size: 71″x71″. Made with Love and Creative Imagination in a smoke-free, pet-free environment.
Jan Murray Brown
Springdale Arkansas
August, 2021

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Jodean Brannan

Entered by: Jodean Brannan

Quilt Pattern: Village Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: I started this quilt in the spring of 2020. Working on it throughout the year became a balm for me during a time that was difficult for so many. The theme of “the village” reminded me of the verse from the Gospel of Mark, Chapter 12, instructing us to “Love your neighbor as yourself.” As I gathered fabrics and pieced each house, I focused on the many examples of good neighbors I saw around me in my community and around the country: the sewers who made and donated fabric masks and the healthcare workers that they were for, the teachers who found new ways to connect with their students, the voluteers who rushed to help those impacted by hurricanes in the Gulf or fires in the west, the soldiers who never quit doing their difficult work, and all the ordinary folks who put compassion above politics and found ways to be flexible to protect the vulnerable around them. The patchwork of fabrics I pulled from my stash are as ecclectic as the diverse members of our community. I decided to hand quilt a heart on each house, and fussy-cuts in the doorways of some of them honor people that I love (including penguins and lions for my two little boys!). While the past year and a half has held sadness for many, my hope is that anyone who sees this quilt will be reminded that there was much good, too.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Jodean Brannan

Entered by: Jodean Brannan

Quilt Pattern: Village Quilt

Category: Contemporary

History: I started this quilt in the spring of 2020. Working on it throughout the year became a balm for me during a time that was difficult for so many. The theme of “the village” reminded me of the verse from the Gospel of Mark, Chapter 12, instructing us to “Love your neighbor as yourself.” As I gathered fabrics and pieced each house, I focused on the many examples of good neighbors I saw around me in my community and around the country: the sewers who made and donated fabric masks and the healthcare workers that they were for, the teachers who found new ways to connect with their students, the voluteers who rushed to help those impacted by hurricanes in the Gulf or fires in the west, the soldiers who never quit doing their difficult work, and all the ordinary folks who put compassion above politics and found ways to be flexible to protect the vulnerable around them. The patchwork of fabrics I pulled from my stash are as ecclectic as the diverse members of our community. I decided to hand quilt a heart on each house, and fussy-cuts in the doorways of some of them honor people that I love (including penguins and lions for my two little boys!) While the past year and a half has held sadness for many, my hope is that anyone who sees this quilt will be reminded that there was much good, too.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Sarah Elizabeth Benson 1891-1976

Entered by: Peggy Way

Quilt Pattern: Grandmother’s Fan, ca. 1956

Category: Antique

History: My grandmother had ten grandchildren and she made a quilt for each one of us. She would hang her quilt tops out on the clothes line and let us pick out “our” quilt. She pieced them on a Singer treadle machine and hand quilted them on a wooden frame that was lowered from the ceiling. Scraps were used. I can identify a piece from a dress I wore on my first day in school in 1956 in this quilt. When she gifted these quilts to us (at our high school graduation) it was with this statement: Whatever you dream the first night you sleep under a new quilt will come true!

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Sarah Elizabeth Benson, 1891 – 1976

Entered by: Peggy Way

Quilt Pattern: Grandmother’s Fan, ca. 1956

Category: Antique

History: My grandmother had ten grandchildren and she made a quilt for each one of us. She would hang her quilt tops out on the clothes line and let us pick out “our” quilt. She pieced them on a Singer treadle machine and hand quilted them on a wooden frame that was lowered from the ceiling. Scraps were used. I can identify a piece from a dress I wore on my first day in school in 1956 in this quilt. When she gifted these quilts to us (at our high school graduation) it was with this statement: Whatever you dream the first night you sleep under a new quilt will come true!

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Laura Neal

Entered by: Laura Neal

Quilt Pattern: Temecula Album

Category: Contemporary

History: Size: 71″ x 62″, made in 2019. This quilt is a slight adaptation of the Temecula Album quilt by Sheryl Johnson. It is appliqued, pieced and free motion longarm quilted. This quilt has the feel of late nineteenth and early twentieth century quilts. Many different block patterns are used throughout in colors of blue, yellow, and red, on a white background. The quilt has a red border with white flowers and has double folded binding, hand-sewn to the back in a navy blue. The backing is a cream color with tiny blue dots throughout.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Laura Neal

Entered by: Laura Neal

Quilt Pattern: Temecula Album

Category: Contemporary

History: Size 71″ x 62″, made in 2019. This quilt is a slight adaptation of the Temecula Album quilt by Sheryl Johnson. It is appliqued, pieced and free motion longarm quilted. This quilt has the feel of late nineteenth and early twentieth century quilts. Many different block patterns are used throughout in colors of blue, yellow, and red, on a white background. The quilt has a red border with white flowers and has double folded binding, hand-sewn to the back in a navy blue. The backing is a cream color with tiny blue dots throughout.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Melissa AJ Dysart

Entered by: Melissa Dysart

Quilt Pattern: Marshall’s Star

Category: Contemporary, digital

History: Since the Phillips’ family of War Eagle has a rich history steeped in the arts and quilt making, a descendant approached this craft from another viewpoint in the imaginative realm of virtual reality.

In 2020, working from a base square of an oil painting, created many years ago, shades of blue borders were added with a grouping of stitched stars. Then, the main bullish block was digitally tacked down with a large star tying together the cohesive motif of Marshall’s Star.

Now, you may ask “Does this quilt exist in the real world?” The simple answer is no because it can only be viewed in the virtual world of digital pixels.

Click to enlarge

Quilter: Melissa AJ Dysart

Entered by: Melissa Dysart

Quilt Pattern: Marshall’s Star

Category: Contemporary, digital

History: Since the Phillips’ family of War Eagle has a rich history steeped in the arts and quilt making, a descendant approached this craft from another viewpoint in the imaginative realm of virtual reality.

In 2020, working from a base square of an oil painting, created many years ago, shades of blue borders were added with a grouping of stitched stars. Then, the main bullish block was digitally tacked down with a large star tying together the cohesive motif of Marshall’s Star.

Now, you may ask “Does this quilt exist in the real world?” The simple answer is no because it can only be viewed in the virtual world of digital pixels.

Thank you for visiting the 43rd Ozark Quilt Fair!