42nd Ozark Quilt Fair

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our Ozark Quilt Fair held on the museum grounds every September has gone virtual for 2020. Many thanks to all the quilters and quilt lovers who have helped us keep the quilt fair going, even in the midst of these trying times.

If you’ve attended our quilt fair in the past, you know that a highlight of the event is live bluegrass music by Working Class Grass. Members of that band have now joined together as the Roving Gambler Band: Walter Shook, lead singer and guitar; Steve Flory, band director and mandolin; Tony Talley, baritone and Dobro; Christine Talley, singer and bass; Adam Hardcastle, banjo; and Tim Case, guitar.

We’re grateful to the band for providing four cuts from their Grass on the Backside of the Moon album for your listening pleasure as you view the quilt gallery.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our Ozark Quilt Fair held on the museum grounds every September has gone virtual for 2020. Many thanks to all the quilters and quilt lovers who have helped us keep the quilt fair going, even in the midst of these trying times.

If you’ve attended our quilt fair in the past, you know that a highlight of the event is live bluegrass music by Working Class Grass. Members of that band have now joined together as the Roving Gambler Band: Walter Shook, lead singer and guitar; Steve Flory, band director and mandolin; Tony Talley, baritone and Dobro; Christine Talley, singer and bass; Adam Hardcastle, banjo; and Tim Case, guitar.

We’re grateful to the band for providing four cuts from their Grass on the Backside of the Moon album for your listening pleasure as you view the quilt gallery.

Quilt Gallery

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Marcia Connors

Entered by: Marcia Connors

Quilt Pattern: Windows

Category: Contemporary

History: Completed in July 2020, this quilt is a project to use various fabrics, mostly blues. Heavy and extra warm, it is a king size. Quilted by machine by Marilyn Gore.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Marcia Connors

Entered by: Marcia Connors

Quilt Pattern: Windows

Category: Contemporary

History: Completed in July 2020, this quilt is a project to use various fabrics, mostly blues. Heavy and extra warm, it is a king size. Quilted by machine by Marilyn Gore.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Paula Mariedaughter

Entered by: Paula Mariedaughter

Quilt Pattern: Original pattern of Nine Patch blocks combined with One Patch blocks in a diagonal setting

Category: Contemporary

History: With my recent trip to Crete in 2017 on my mind, I admired this fabric featuring whitewashed houses with blue doors and climbing bougainvillea flowers like those I saw in Greece. I designed this quilt around that memorable fabric, choosing other fabrics to highlight my original choice. The rich blue linen squares used in several rows is the same blue linen of the shell and shirt I wore constantly during two weeks in Crete. The diagonal design which extends into the border pleases my eye. Color, shape, texture, and especially value all play a part in the visual impact. For obvious reasons, I’ve named this quilt “Remembering Crete.” I machine quilted it in 2018 on my vintage 1981 Bernina 930 sewing machine. Now age 75, I’ve been quilting since 1994 and sewing my entire life.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Paula Mariedaughter

Entered by: Paula Mariedaughter

Quilt Pattern: Original pattern of Nine Patch blocks combined with One Patch blocks in a diagonal setting

Category: Contemporary

History: With my recent trip to Crete in 2017 on my mind, I admired this fabric featuring whitewashed houses with blue doors and climbing bougainvillea flowers like those I saw in Greece. I designed this quilt around that memorable fabric, choosing other fabrics to highlight my original choice. The rich blue linen squares used in several rows is the same blue linen of the shell and shirt I wore constantly during two weeks in Crete. The diagonal design which extends into the border pleases my eye. Color, shape, texture, and especially value all play a part in the visual impact. For obvious reasons, I’ve named this quilt “Remembering Crete.” I machine quilted it in 2018 on my vintage 1981 Bernina 930 sewing machine. Now age 75, I’ve been quilting since 1994 and sewing my entire life.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jody Davis

Entered by: Brian Austin

Quilt Pattern: Blue Cross

Category: Contemporary

History: Jody Davis is a talented quilt maker. In addition to her full-time career at the University of Arkansas, Jody enjoys enjoys knitting, gardening, and cooking.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jody Davis

Entered by: Brian Austin

Quilt Pattern: Blue Cross

Category: Contemporary

History: Jody Davis is a talented quilt maker. In addition to her full-time career at the University of Arkansas, Jody enjoys enjoys knitting, gardening, and cooking.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Barbara Plymire

Entered by: Sophia Calzada

Quilt Pattern:  Nine-Patch Sampler

Category: Contemporary

History: This is a quilt that I got from my great-aunt Bobbie—Barbara Plymire (née Fleet)—who lives in Stuarts Draft, Virginia. She was born on August 24, 1932, in Columbus, Ohio. She made this quilt for me in 2017, and I feel thankful to her for it. It’s nice and warm and looks perfect in my bedroom.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Barbara Plymire

Entered by: Sophia Calzada

Quilt Pattern: Nine-Patch Sampler

Category: Contemporary

History: This is a quilt that I got from my great-aunt Bobbie—Barbara Plymire (née Fleet)—who lives in Stuarts Draft, Virginia. She was born on August 24, 1932, in Columbus, Ohio. She made this quilt for me in 2017, and I feel thankful to her for it. It’s nice and warm and looks perfect in my bedroom.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Laura Buttram

Entered by: Cathy Whitney

Quilt Pattern: Eccentric Star

Category: Antique

History: This quilt was made by my paternal grandfather’s baby sister, Laura Calista Buttram (née Whitney), known as “Dutch.” Aunt Dutch was born in 1897 and grew up in a large family on a farm near Melvern, Kansas. I think she lived into the 1980s, but I have no idea when she made this particular quilt. I was delighted to discover it a few years ago in a cedar chest inherited from my mother, along with a note in my mother’s hand that said simply, “Made by Dutch.”

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Laura Buttram

Entered by: Cathy Whitney

Quilt Pattern: Eccentric Star

Category: Antique

History: This quilt was made by my paternal grandfather’s baby sister, Laura Calista Buttram (née Whitney), known as “Dutch.” Aunt Dutch was born in 1897 and grew up in a large family on a farm near Melvern, Kansas. I think she lived into the 1980s, but I have no idea when she made this particular quilt. I was delighted to discover it a few years ago in a cedar chest inherited from my mother, along with a note in my mother’s hand that said simply, “Made by Dutch.”

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Tammy Bigfeather

Quilt Pattern: Kaleidoscope

Category: Antique

History: I purchased this quilt from my great-grandmother Maude (Rogers) Beanstick’s estate sale in 1996, who is a descendent of the Reuben Wilson Rogers family from Madison County, Arkansas. She was 102 when she died and the quilt looks to be from the early 1900s. 

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Tammy Bigfeather

Quilt Pattern: Kaleidoscope

Category: Antique

History: I purchased this quilt from my great-grandmother Maude (Rogers) Beanstick’s estate sale in 1996, who is a descendent of the Reuben Wilson Rogers family from Madison County, Arkansas. She was 102 when she died and the quilt looks to be from the early 1900s. 

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Joan Miller

Entered by: Joan Miller

Quilt Pattern: Kaleidoscope Stars

Category: Contemporary

History: This is a quilt wall hanging that I made for two dear friends as a housewarming gift.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Joan Miller Entered by: Joan Miller Quilt Pattern: Kaleidoscope Stars Category: Contemporary History: This is a quilt wall hanging that I made for two dear friends as a housewarming gift.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Marti Olesen

Entered by: Marti Olesen

Quilt Pattern: Free Form

Category: Contemporary

History: I worked on this quilt as part of the “Liza Lou #Apartogether” collaboration for creativity and comfort during the COVID-19 pandemic. It was truly comforting to stitch, and the colors almost chose themselves as I looked for materials I had on hand (one of the requirements for the collaboration). I’m a slow stitcher so it took me months to finish but I completed it just in time for Memorial Day, especially memorable this year for the many who have lost their lives since the pandemic began.

The quilt is made from silks and velvet. The coral is a piece my daughter brought back from a summer teaching in Thailand that I finally had the courage to use. The rose pinks are from a skirt my aunt gave me years ago. So many memories in a single quilt.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Marti Olesen

Entered by: Marti Olesen

Quilt Pattern: Free Form

Category: Contemporary

History: I worked on this quilt as part of the “Liza Lou #Apartogether” collaboration for creativity and comfort during the COVID-19 pandemic. It was truly comforting to stitch, and the colors almost chose themselves as I looked for materials I had on hand (one of the requirements for the collaboration). I’m a slow stitcher so it took me months to finish but I completed it just in time for Memorial Day, especially memorable this year for the many who have lost their lives since the pandemic began.

The quilt is made from silks and velvet. The coral is a piece my daughter brought back from a summer teaching in Thailand that I finally had the courage to use. The rose pinks are from a skirt my aunt gave me years ago. So many memories in a single quilt.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jan Murray Brown

Entered by: Jan Murray Brown

Quilt Pattern: Signature

Category: Antique

History: Rose Greene, Elsie Fulton, Doris Triggs: beautiful legacy in quilt form. Names embroidered on blocks of a quilt, names with as much personality as each signature and color of thread, probably women who knew one another, who went to the same church or lived in the same town, possibly kinfolk. That’s what we can wonder about as we take a look at this quilt.

Back in 1980, a friend traveling from Texas through Oklahoma to Arkansas brought me a stack of these quilt blocks. There were twenty blocks complete and one extra with no signature that I used to sign the back myself, all these years later. The blocks are harmonious and lovely. Probably the fabrics are feedsacks and some humble solids. Each woman chose the color of her embroidery thread for her signature and, if you look closely, you can see how she must have penciled in her signature before signing her name. The blocks are mostly hand-pieced.

By 2016, it was time to assemble the blocks. Each block finished at 11½” square. They are bordered by Kona cotton in buttery yellow and mint green. (This top was shown at the 2016 Ozark Quilt Fair.) I hand-quilted this quilt with a “Baptist Fan” design using a method from quilter Bonnie Hunter, beginning at the outer perimeter and quilting toward the center. Backing and batting are 100% cotton. Size: 54″ x 67″.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jan Murray Brown

Entered by: Jan Murray Brown

Quilt Pattern: Signature

Category: Antique

History: Rose Greene, Elsie Fulton, Doris Triggs: beautiful legacy in quilt form. Names embroidered on blocks of a quilt, names with as much personality as each signature and color of thread, probably women who knew one another, who went to the same church or lived in the same town, possibly kinfolk. That’s what we can wonder about as we take a look at this quilt.

Back in 1980, a friend traveling from Texas through Oklahoma to Arkansas brought me a stack of these quilt blocks. There were twenty blocks complete and one extra with no signature that I used to sign the back myself, all these years later. The blocks are harmonious and lovely. Probably the fabrics are feedsacks and some humble solids. Each woman chose the color of her embroidery thread for her signature and, if you look closely, you can see how she must have penciled in her signature before signing her name. The blocks are mostly hand-pieced.

By 2016, it was time to assemble the blocks. Each block finished at 11½” square. They are bordered by Kona cotton in buttery yellow and mint green. (This top was shown at the 2016 Ozark Quilt Fair.) I hand-quilted this quilt with a “Baptist Fan” design using a method from quilter Bonnie Hunter, beginning at the outer perimeter and quilting toward the center. Backing and batting are 100% cotton. Size: 54″ x 67″.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Susan B. Decker

Entered by: Susan B. Decker

Quilt Pattern: Layin’ Pipe by Sew Fresh Quilts

Category: Contemporary

History: My husband recently retired from forty years as a plumber. I made this for him when he retired.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Susan B. Decker

Entered by: Susan B. Decker

Quilt Pattern: Layin’ Pipe by Sew Fresh Quilts

Category: Contemporary

History: My husband recently retired from forty years as a plumber. I made this for him when he retired.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Gwen Bennett

Quilt Pattern: Cathedral Window

Category: Antique

History: Queen-size quilt with two pillow shams. Commissioned by unknown artist from Fayetteville for the 1976 Bicentennial.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Gwen Bennett

Quilt Pattern: Cathedral Window

Category: Antique

History: Queen-size quilt with two pillow shams. Commissioned by unknown artist from Fayetteville for the 1976 Bicentennial.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook

Entered by: Vicki M. McGovern

Quilt Pattern: Flower in a Diamond

Category: Antique

History: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook (1885–1985), my great-grandmother, was a quiltmaker her entire life. She was proud of her Native American heritage. If you asked her neighbors in Ozark, Arkansas, they would say there wasn’t a single family she didn’t help. Lucinda grew a garden and canned her winter food until she was ninety and could no longer push a plow. Her quilts are cherished throughout her extensive family.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook

Entered by: Vicki M. McGovern

Quilt Pattern: Flower in a Diamond

Category: Antique

History: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook (1885–1985), my great-grandmother, was a quiltmaker her entire life. She was proud of her Native American heritage. If you asked her neighbors in Ozark, Arkansas, they would say there wasn’t a single family she didn’t help. Lucinda grew a garden and canned her winter food until she was ninety and could no longer push a plow. Her quilts are cherished throughout her extensive family.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook

Entered by: Priscilla Burns

Quilt Pattern: River of Fans

Category: Antique

History: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook (1885–1985) was a quilter [true fabric artist] most of her 100 years of life. She was very proud of her Native American Indian heritage. If you asked her neighbors in Ozark, Arkansas, they would say there wasn’t a single family she didn’t help. Lucinda grew a garden and canned her winter food until she was ninety and could no longer push a plow. Her many quilts are cherished by the vast number of lucky people who received one as a gift.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook

Entered by: Priscilla Burns

Quilt Pattern: River of Fans

Category: Antique

History: Lucinda Yandell Williams Middlebrook (1885–1985) was a quilter [true fabric artist] most of her 100 years of life. She was very proud of her Native American Indian heritage. If you asked her neighbors in Ozark, Arkansas, they would say there wasn’t a single family she didn’t help. Lucinda grew a garden and canned her winter food until she was ninety and could no longer push a plow. Her many quilts are cherished by the vast number of lucky people who received one as a gift.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jeanene Weiland

Entered by: Jeanene Weiland

Quilt Pattern: On-Point Fauna by Anita Goodesign

Category: Contemporary

History: My husband, Darrell, and I moved to Arkansas thirty-three years ago. He accepted a position as pilot for eighteen years with Walmart. I truly enjoy machine embroidery; I bought my first Bernina machine in 2009. “On-Point Fauna” by Anita Goodesign, embroidered in-the-hoop, is a baby quilt for our great-grandchild. This quilt has become my keeper. I am now quilting in-the-hoop an embroidered appliqué baby quilt for our January 2021 great-grandchild.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jeanene Weiland

Entered by: Jeanene Weiland

Quilt Pattern: On-Point Fauna by Anita Goodesign

Category: Contemporary

History: My husband, Darrell, and I moved to Arkansas thirty-three years ago. He accepted a position as pilot for eighteen years with Walmart. I truly enjoy machine embroidery; I bought my first Bernina in 2009. “On-Point Fauna” by Anita Goodesign, embroidered in-the-hoop, is a baby quilt for our great-grandchild. This quilt has become my keeper. I am now quilting in-the-hoop an embroidered appliqué baby quilt for our January 2021 great-grandchild.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Faith Standley

Entered by: Cheryl Larson

Quilt Pattern: Handkerchief appliqué

Category: Antique

History: Quilt made in honor of my grandmother, Louise Vielguth (1899–1966). Like any lady of her era, my grandmother never was seen in public without a hat and a hankie in her purse. She collected pretty handkerchiefs. In 1986 Louise’s daughter, Faith Standley, decided to make three quilts from Louise’s handkerchiefs: one for herself, one for my brother, and one for me. She designed the layout, appliquéd the handkerchiefs to a coordinating pastel block, then pieced them together. One handkerchief has “Louise” embroidered on it and one has “Mother.” Both Louise and Faith lived in Kansas their entire lives, hence the Kansas handkerchief.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Faith Standley

Entered by: Cheryl Larson

Quilt Pattern: Handkerchief appliqué

Category: Antique

History: Quilt made in honor of my grandmother, Louise Vielguth (1899–1966). Like any lady of her era, my grandmother never was seen in public without a hat and a hankie in her purse. She collected pretty handkerchiefs. In 1986 Louise’s daughter, Faith Standley, decided to make three quilts from Louise’s handkerchiefs: one for herself, one for my brother, and one for me. She designed the layout, appliquéd the handkerchiefs to a coordinating pastel block, then pieced them together. One handkerchief has “Louise” embroidered on it and one has “Mother.” Both Louise and Faith lived in Kansas their entire lives, hence the Kansas handkerchief.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Edna Beutler Yost

Entered by: Craig Larson

Quilt Pattern: Airplane baby quilt

Category: Antique

History: Quilt pieced and quilted by Edna Beutler Yost (1889–1963) for Craig Larson in 1953. Edna lived in rural Missouri until the 1940s when the family resided in Kansas City for a time. Craig and his siblings were unaware of this quilt until his mother, Gale Larson, was downsizing and pulled out a pile of quilts from a closet. The airplane motif is quite appropriate considering Craig’s lifelong interest in vehicles, ships, and planes. Craig volunteers in the collections department of the Shiloh Museum.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Edna Beutler Yost

Entered by: Craig Larson

Quilt Pattern: Airplane baby quilt

Category: Antique

History: Quilt pieced and quilted by Edna Beutler Yost (1889–1963) for Craig Larson in 1953. Edna lived in rural Missouri until the 1940s when the family resided in Kansas City for a time. Craig and his siblings were unaware of this quilt until his mother, Gale Larson, was downsizing and pulled out a pile of quilts from a closet. The airplane motif is quite appropriate considering Craig’s lifelong interest in vehicles, ships, and planes. Craig volunteers in the collections department of the Shiloh Museum.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Clare Collins

Entered by: Marie Demeroukas

Quilt Pattern: Carolina Lily with Goose Tracks border

Category: Contemporary

History: This miniature quilt is based on an 1878 quilt at the Rogers Historical Museum, where I once worked as the collections manager. Clare Collins, one of my favorite volunteers of all time, helped take care of the quilts. An avid quilter, in 2002 she gave me this replica, because she knew that it was the quilt I loved best. The following year it was shown at the “Tomorrow’s Heirloom IX” quilt show presented by the Q.U.I.L.T. Guild of Northwest Arkansas, where it won second place in its division. While Clare has passed on, my memory of her is strong, thanks in part to a wonderful gift from a lovely and talented friend.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Clare Collins

Entered by: Marie Demeroukas

Quilt Pattern: Carolina Lily with Goose Tracks border

Category: Contemporary

History: This miniature quilt is based on an 1878 quilt at the Rogers Historical Museum, where I once worked as the collections manager. Clare Collins, one of my favorite volunteers of all time, helped take care of the quilts. An avid quilter, in 2002 she gave me this replica, because she knew that it was the quilt I loved best. The following year it was shown at the “Tomorrow’s Heirloom IX” quilt show presented by the Q.U.I.L.T. Guild of Northwest Arkansas, where it won second place in its division. While Clare has passed on, my memory of her is strong, thanks in part to a wonderful gift from a lovely and talented friend.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Sara Torbett

Quilt Pattern: Marigold

Category: Contemporary

History: From the quilter, Lois Capper: “Marigold” is a free pattern that I  found at Fat Quarter Shop.com. I chose to use these colors because they seem “happy” to me. Machine pieced and hand quilted.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Sara Torbett

Quilt Pattern: Marigold

Category: Contemporary

History: Written by the quilter, Lois Capper: Marigold is a free pattern that I found at Fat Quarter Shop.com. I chose to use these colors because they seem “happy” to me. Machine pieced and hand quilted.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Jana McCraine

Quilt Pattern: Marigold

Category: Contemporary

History: Written by the quilter, Lois Capper: The pattern is from the quilt book, Civil War Remembered. I cleaned out my scrap box when making this one since it uses 1¼-inch squares. Machine pieced and hand quilted. Can you find the “one flag”? My twelve-year-old grandson, Caleb, particularly enjoys this quilt, as he was born on July 4th.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Jana McCraine

Quilt Pattern: Marigold

Category: Contemporary

History: Written by the quilter, Lois Capper: The pattern is from the quilt book, Civil War Remembered. I cleaned out my scrap box when making this one since it uses 1¼-inch squares. Machine pieced and hand quilted. Can you find the “one flag”? My twelve-year-old grandson, Caleb, particularly enjoys this quilt, as he was born on July 4th.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Becca Cross

Quilt Pattern: Warm Regards

Category: Contemporary

History: Written by the quilter, Lois Capper: “Warm Regards” is found in Kim Diehl and Jo Morton’s book, Simple Friendships. I omitted the center appliqué. I enjoyed making all the yo-yos while traveling one summer. Machine pieced and hand quilted.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lois Capper

Entered by: Becca Cross

Quilt Pattern: Warm Regards

Category: Contemporary

History: Written by the quilter, Lois Capper: “Warm Regards” is found in Kim Diehl and Jo Morton’s book, Simple Friendships. I omitted the center appliqué. I enjoyed making all the yo-yos while traveling one summer. Machine pieced and hand quilted.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Verna Ging and Lois Capper

Entered by: Lois Capper

Quilt Pattern: Star of the Bluegrass

Category: Antique

History: This quilt was hand-pieced by my grandmother, Verna Ging, for me when I was around six to nine years old. I remember her working for hours on the trapunta blocks. She found the pattern on the back of a “Mountain Mist” batting label (which I still have!). After I got married in 1977, Grandma gave me the finished quilt top. I didn’t want anyone else to quilt it, but didn’t think I could do it justice. After raising our three daughters, I began to pursue quilting with a passion. Finally, during the 1990s, I decided to tackle quilting this treasure. I even had the matching backing that my grandmother had intended to use. I hand-quilted it with my best, smallest stitches. It holds such wonderful memories for me and I hope my daughters and granddaughters will treasure it for years to come.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Verna Ging and Lois Capper

Entered by: Lois Capper

Quilt Pattern: Star of the Bluegrass

Category: Antique

History: This quilt was hand-pieced by my grandmother, Verna Ging, for me when I was around six to nine years old. I remember her working for hours on the trapunta blocks. She found the pattern on the back of a “Mountain Mist” batting label (which I still have!). After I got married in 1977, Grandma gave me the finished quilt top. I didn’t want anyone else to quilt it, but didn’t think I could do it justice. After raising our three daughters, I began to pursue quilting with a passion. Finally, during the 1990s, I decided to tackle quilting this treasure. I even had the matching backing that my grandmother had intended to use. I hand-quilted it with my best, smallest stitches. It holds such wonderful memories for me and I hope my daughters and granddaughters will treasure it for years to come.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: RoseMary Davis

Entered by: Michael Freels

Quilt Pattern: Sawtooth variation

Category: Contemporary

History: This twin-sized quilt was purchased by the Washington County Cemetery Preservation Group in 2016. Later the quilt was purchased by Sandra Freels and is now part of her collection.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: RoseMary Davis

Entered by: Michael Freels

Quilt Pattern: Sawtooth variation

Category: Contemporary

History: This twin-sized quilt was purchased by the Washington County Cemetery Preservation Group in 2016. Later the quilt was purchased by Sandra Freels and is now part of her collection.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Clara Eliza Diffenbacher Ewalt

Entered by: Drew Wallis

Quilt Pattern: Postage Stamp

Category: Antique

History: This quilt is made of the baby dresses of Wanda Lea Boone Cram (b. 1927). Each fabric from the dresses is ¾” x ¾”. Wanda was a fun-loving firecracker. She loved life and dreamed of her curly headed grandbaby she didn’t get to meet. Her family made their home in Springdale, arriving by covered wagon from Great Bend, Kansas, in the 1880s. Wanda’s mother, Harriett Ewalt Boone (b. 1904), pieced the quilt. Harriett was married to P. W. Boone and retired as a nurse from Springdale Memorial Hospital in the 1980s. They had two children: Wanda Lea and her brother Sanford Boone (of Boone-Ritter Insurance Company), who had a hand in developing Springdale. Their grandmother, Clara Ewalt, did the quilting. She was wife of J. S. Ewalt, mayor of Springdale from 1919 to 1924.

Wanda passed away in 1984 at the age of 57. She is still dearly missed. Wanda and her parents are charter members of First Methodist Church in Springdale. This quilt now belongs to Wanda’s grandson, handed down from her son, Derry Wallis, deceased.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Clara Eliza Diffenbacher Ewalt

Entered by: Drew Wallis

Quilt Pattern: Postage Stamp

Category: Antique

History: This quilt is made of the baby dresses of Wanda Lea Boone Cram (b. 1927). Each fabric from the dresses is ¾” x ¾”. Wanda was a fun-loving firecracker. She loved life and dreamed of her curly headed grandbaby she didn’t get to meet. Her family made their home in Springdale, arriving by covered wagon from Great Bend, Kansas, in the 1880s. Wanda’s mother, Harriett Ewalt Boone (b. 1904), pieced the quilt. Harriett was married to P. W. Boone and retired as a nurse from Springdale Memorial Hospital in the 1980s. They had two children: Wanda Lea and her brother Sanford Boone (of Boone-Ritter Insurance Company), who had a hand in developing Springdale. Their grandmother, Clara Ewalt, did the quilting. She was wife of J. S. Ewalt, mayor of Springdale from 1919 to 1924.

Wanda passed away in 1984 at the age of 57. She is still dearly missed. Wanda and her parents are charter members of First Methodist Church in Springdale. This quilt now belongs to Wanda’s grandson, handed down from her son, Derry Wallis, deceased.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Rosa Yoder

Entered by: Ellen Corbett-Welch

Quilt Pattern: Trip Around the World

Category: Contemporary

History: Amish Quilt purchased on Cape Cod in 2005.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Rosa Yoder

Entered by: Ellen Corbett-Welch

Quilt Pattern: Trip Around the World

Category: Contemporary

History: Amish quilt purchased on Cape Cod in 2005.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Kathy Corbett-Welch

Quilt Pattern: Irish Chain

Category: Antique

History: Purchased in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 2013.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Unknown

Entered by: Kathy Corbett-Welch

Quilt Pattern: Irish Chain

Category: Antique

History: Purchased in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 2013.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Laurie Foster and Mary Scott, members of Son’s Chapel Quilters

Entered by: Son’s Chapel Quilters

Quilt Pattern: Grandma’s Fan with Dresden Plate blocks

Category: Contemporary

History: This is a beautiful quilt! The “fans” are a “Dresden Plate” pattern of very colorful, flowered fabric, fancy-cut for a scalloped-edge design. The quilt was designed, hand-appliquéd, and sewn by Laurie Foster and hand-quilted by Mary Scott in 2020.

This quilt was to be our 2020 Raffle Quilt for the annual Son’s Chapel Craft and Quilt Fair, cancelled due to COVID-19. Maybe next year?

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Laurie Foster and Mary Scott, members of Son’s Chapel Quilters

Entered by: Son’s Chapel Quilters

Quilt Pattern: Grandma’s Fan with Dresden Plate blocks

Category: Contemporary

History: This is a beautiful quilt! The “fans” are a “Dresden Plate” pattern of very colorful, flowered fabric, fancy-cut for a scalloped-edge design. The quilt was designed, hand-appliquéd, and sewn by Laurie Foster and hand-quilted by Mary Scott in 2020.

This quilt was to be our 2020 Raffle Quilt for the annual Son’s Chapel Craft and Quilt Fair, cancelled due to COVID-19. Maybe next year?

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Charlene Olsen

Entered by: Charlene Olsen

Quilt Pattern: Apples

Category: Contemporary

History: Apple history. We moved to Arkansas in 1971. We had apple trees in Illinois for the children. My husband contacted the University of Arkansas for information on planting apples here and planted the trees in Rogers. We learned the history of apples in Arkansas and took the children to see an orchard on Highway 71. We watched the trees there being sprayed, and went to see the beautiful blooms and the harvest. We enjoyed the opportunity to observe each year.

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Quilter: Charlene Olsen

Entered by: Charlene Olsen

Quilt Pattern: Apples

Category: Contemporary

History: Apple history. We moved to Arkansas in 1971. We had apple trees in Illinois for the children. My husband contacted the University of Arkansas for information on planting apples here and planted the trees in Rogers. We learned the history of apples in Arkansas and took the children to see an orchard on Highway 71. We watched the trees there being sprayed, and went to see the beautiful blooms and the harvest. We enjoyed the opportunity to observe each year.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Carol E. Kick

Entered by: Carol E. Kick

Quilt Pattern: Fishing for Trout at Cotter

Category: Contemporary

History: Quilt was designed for our fishing cabin on the White River. The center panel of log-cabin blocks form four trees, depicting our love of the forest. “Dancing Waters” quilting design entices appliquéd brown and rainbow trout to swim in the river. Note the hand-embroidered “fly” in the upper right hand corner—the objective of the big brown trout. A sandy riverbank leads the flying geese (border) to watch all that goes during a day at the river.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Carol E. Kick

Entered by: Carol E. Kick

Quilt Pattern: Fishing for Trout at Cotter

Category: Contemporary

History: Quilt was designed for our fishing cabin on the White River. The center panel of log-cabin blocks form four trees, depicting our love of the forest. “Dancing Waters” quilting design entices appliquéd brown and rainbow trout to swim in the river. Note the hand-embroidered “fly” in the upper right hand corner—the objective of the big brown trout. A sandy riverbank leads the flying geese (border) to watch all that goes during a day at the river.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Janet Parsch

Entered by: Janet Parsch

Quilt Pattern: Star of the Bluegrass

Category: Antique

History: In the mid-1960s my older sister, Marcia, decided to make a “Lone Star” quilt, and so I decided I also needed to make a quilt. I chose the “Star of the Bluegrass” pattern. The Mountain Mist pattern called for trapunto quilting. I had no idea what that was—or how much time it would take!—but I wanted to follow the pattern exactly. I finished piecing the quilt top in 1967 and finished the quilting fourteen years later in 1981. The quilt is all-cotton and stitched entirely by me by hand—piecing, trapunto quilting, and final quilting. It was years later that I noticed that one of the stars was rotated one point off in the color scheme, showing again that only God makes perfect quilts. My oldest sister, Nancy, and I have jointly made a quilt for four of our nieces and nephews.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Janet Parsch

Entered by: Janet Parsch

Quilt Pattern: Star of the Bluegrass

Category: Antique

History: In the mid-1960s my older sister, Marcia, decided to make a “Lone Star” quilt, and so I decided I also needed to make a quilt. I chose the “Star of the Bluegrass” pattern. The Mountain Mist pattern called for trapunto quilting. I had no idea what that was—or how much time it would take!—but I wanted to follow the pattern exactly. I finished piecing the quilt top in 1967 and finished the quilting fourteen years later in 1981. The quilt is all-cotton and stitched entirely by me by hand—piecing, trapunto quilting, and final quilting. It was years later that I noticed that one of the stars was rotated one point off in the color scheme, showing again that only God makes perfect quilts. My oldest sister, Nancy, and I have jointly made a quilt for four of our nieces and nephews.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lila Rostenberg

Entered by: Lila Rostenberg

Quilt Pattern: Anthologie, bohemian-style

Category: Contemporary

History: A scrappy-look eclectic quilt. The pattern is from Melanie Traylor at Southern Charm Quilts. It features vintage household linens appliquéd for a special collage feel.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Lila Rostenberg

Entered by: Lila Rostenberg

Quilt Pattern: Anthologie, bohemian-style

Category: Contemporary

History: A scrappy-look eclectic quilt. The pattern is from Melanie Traylor at Southern Charm Quilts. It features vintage household linens appliquéd for a special collage feel.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Anna Richardson and Joy Penrod

Entered by: Joy Penrod

Quilt Pattern: Dutch Boy and Girl

Category: Antique

History: Quilt begun in 1935 by Elizabeth Randolph. Top finished by Lena Randolph. Quilted by Anna (Randolph) Richardson and Joy (Randolph) Penrod in 2005.

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Quilter: Anna Richardson and Joy Penrod

Entered by: Joy Penrod

Quilt Pattern: Dutch Boy and Girl

Category: Antique

History: Quilt begun in 1935 by Elizabeth Randolph. Top finished by Lena Randolph. Quilted by Anna (Randolph) Richardson and Joy (Randolph) Penrod in 2005.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Rita Zelei

Entered by: Rita Zelei

Quilt Pattern: BCS: Breast Cancer Survivor

Category: Contemporary

History: This quilt is an original design, using a breast cancer scarf (worn in a “cancer race”) as the focal center, thus becoming a cherished keepsake as well as a “trophy” quilt!  The nine-patch squares have fabric of pink and tiny pink rose print, selected as soft, feminine, and loving. The alternating squares are breast cancer pink logo ribbons and hand-embroidered. And the quilt is hand-quilted. The quilt is a cuddly, useful lap quilt, 36″ x 52″, and sewn in 2017.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Rita Zelei

Entered by: Rita Zelei

Quilt Pattern: BCS: Breast Cancer Survivor

Category: Contemporary

History: This quilt is an original design, using a breast cancer scarf (worn in a “cancer race”) as the focal center; thus becoming a cherished keepsake as well as a “trophy” quilt!  The nine-patch squares have fabric of pink and tiny pink rose print, selected as soft, feminine, and loving. The alternating squares are breast cancer pink logo ribbons and hand-embroidered. And the quilt is hand-quilted. The quilt is a cuddly, useful lap quilt, 36″ x 52″, and sewn in 2017.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jewell Day Jones

Entered by: Leslie M. Oliver

Quilt Pattern: Butterfly appliqué

Category: Antique

History: Three generations of women worked on this quilt. Pieced and appliquéd by my great-grandmother, Lillian Lee Stewart Jones (1873–1940). Quilted by my grandmother, Jewell Day Jones (1899–1985). I added the binding.

Click to enlarge.

Quilter: Jewell Day Jones

Entered by: Leslie M. Oliver

Quilt Pattern: Butterfly appliqué

Category: Antique

History: Three generations of women worked on this quilt. Pieced and appliquéd by my great-grandmother, Lillian Lee Stewart Jones (1873–1940). Quilted by my grandmother, Jewell Day Jones (1899–1985). I added the binding.

Thank you for visiting the 42nd Ozark Quilt Fair!