Donated by Robert Winn

1939 Worlds' Fair jigsaw puzzleThis jigsaw puzzle was a souvenir of the 1939 New York’s World’s Fair held at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, New York. With a slogan of “Dawn of a New Day,”  the fair opened on April 30, 1939, the anniversary of George Washington’s inauguration. At cost of $160 million, the 1939 World’s Fair’s price tag was second only to the St. Louis Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. 

As part of the fair’s festivities, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company prepared a time capsule that was buried in 1938 and sealed in 1939. Among its contents are copies of Life magazine, a kewpie doll, a pack of cigarettes, a hat made by famed designer Lilly Daché, microfilmed copies of an almanac, a dictionary, and a Sears Roebuck catalog, and an RKO newsreel. The time capsule is scheduled to be reopened 5000 years after it was sealed, in 6939.

The 1939 World’s Fair ran through the fall of 1940 and attracted more than 44 million visitors.

1939 World's Fair, showing the Perisphere, Trylon, and Four Victories of Peace sculpture.

1939 World’s Fair, showing the Theme Center (No. 1 on the jigsaw puzzle) and Four Victories of Peace sculpture. Gottscho-Schleisner, Inc., photographer. Courtesy Library of Congress


About the donor: Robert Winn (1903–1996) was a teacher, World War II veteran, local historian, and author. Born and raised near Winslow (Washington County), he graduated from Asbury College in Kentucky and received a master’s degree from the University of Florida.

After spending much of his career as an educator in California, Winn returned home to Northwest Arkansas in 1970 where he established himself as a tireless chronicler of local history. He wrote seven books and countless articles for the Washington County Observer, the Northwest Arkansas Times, and Washington County Historical Society’s quarterly Flashback. Longtime Morning News of Northwest Arkansas journalist Kay Hall once wrote that Robert Winn “had more knowledge of state history and background information ‘in his head’ than many libraries have on their shelves.” 

Robert Winn was also a tireless supporter of the Shiloh Museum. Over the years, he donated hundreds of artifacts to the museum, including his diaries which contain daily entries spanning 70 years.

1939 Worlds' Fair jigsaw puzzle

Donated by Robert Winn

1939 Worlds' Fair jigsaw puzzleThis jigsaw puzzle was a souvenir of the 1939 New York’s World’s Fair held at Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, New York. With a slogan of “Dawn of a New Day,”  the fair opened on April 30, 1939, the anniversary of George Washington’s inauguration. At cost of $160 million, the 1939 World’s Fair’s price tag was second only to the St. Louis Louisiana Purchase Exposition of 1904. 

As part of the fair’s festivities, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company prepared a time capsule that was buried in 1938 and sealed in 1939. Among its contents are copies of Life magazine, a kewpie doll, a pack of cigarettes, a hat made by famed designer Lilly Daché, microfilmed copies of an almanac, a dictionary, and a Sears Roebuck catalog, and an RKO newsreel. The time capsule is scheduled to be reopened 5000 years after it was sealed, in 6939.

The 1939 World’s Fair ran through the fall of 1940 and attracted more than 44 million visitors.

1939 World's Fair, showing the Perisphere, Trylon, and Four Victories of Peace sculpture.

1939 World’s Fair, showing the Theme Center (No. 1 on the jigsaw puzzle) and Four Victories of Peace sculpture. Gottscho-Schleisner, Inc., photographer. Courtesy Library of Congress


About the donor: Robert Winn (1903–1996) was a teacher, World War II veteran, local historian, and author. Born and raised near Winslow (Washington County), he graduated from Asbury College in Kentucky and received a master’s degree from the University of Florida.

After spending much of his career as an educator in California, Winn returned home to Northwest Arkansas in 1970 where he established himself as a tireless chronicler of local history. He wrote seven books and countless articles for the Washington County Observer, the Northwest Arkansas Times, and Washington County Historical Society’s quarterly Flashback. Longtime Morning News of Northwest Arkansas journalist Kay Hall once wrote that Robert Winn “had more knowledge of state history and background information ‘in his head’ than many libraries have on their shelves.” 

Robert Winn was also a tireless supporter of the Shiloh Museum. Over the years, he donated hundreds of artifacts to the museum, including his diaries which contain daily entries spanning 70 years.