Halloween Accessories

Donated by Susan and Orville Hall Jr.

1930s Halloween tambourine and hatThis tin tambourine and crepe paper party hat date to the late 1930s or early 1940s. The tambourine was made by Kirchhof, a company in Newark, New Jersey, that specialized in small metal toys, noisemakers, seasonal ornaments, and other novelties. The hat is probably homemade.  The sides are held together with staples and the black bow on the top is secured by thin wire.

Orville Hall Jr. was born in 1935 in Fayetteville to Orville Sr., an agricultural and business economics professor at the University of Arkansas, and Janie Haigh Hall. Orville Jr. was an only child who lovingly cared for his toys, many of which he and his wife, Susan, have donated to the Shiloh Museum. He remembers wearing masks and hats at Halloween, and believes that the tambourine came from a Halloween party long, long ago.

 

Donated by Susan and Orville Hall Jr.

1930s Halloween tambourine and hatThis tin tambourine and crepe paper party hat date to the late 1930s or early 1940s. The tambourine was made by Kirchhof, a company in Newark, New Jersey, that specialized in small metal toys, noisemakers, seasonal ornaments, and other novelties. The hat is probably homemade.  The sides are held together with staples and the black bow on the top is secured by thin wire.

Orville Hall Jr. was born in 1935 in Fayetteville to Orville Sr., an agricultural and business economics professor at the University of Arkansas, and Janie Haigh Hall. Orville Jr. was an only child who lovingly cared for his toys, many of which he and his wife, Susan, have donated to the Shiloh Museum. He remembers wearing masks and hats at Halloween, and believes that the tambourine came from a Halloween party long, long ago.

 

Cardboard Bunnies

From left: Ruth Haigh Roberts, Lawrence Roberts, Orville Hall Jr. , and Janie Haigh Hall, at the Hall home in Fayetteville, April 9, 1939. Orville Hall Jr. Collection (S-2009-60-6)

Donated by Susan and Orville Hall Jr.

Bunnies made of molded or pressed cardboard or pulp were popular Easter decorations during the 1930s and 1940s. These belonged to Orville Hall Jr. of Fayetteville, the son of Orville Sr. and Janie Haigh Hall.

Donated by Susan and Orville Hall Jr.

Bunnies made of molded or pressed cardboard or pulp were popular Easter decorations during the 1930s and 1940s. These belonged to Orville Hall Jr. of Fayetteville, the son of Orville Sr. and Janie Haigh Hall.

From left: Ruth Haigh Roberts, Lawrence Roberts, Orville Hall Jr. , and Janie Haigh Hall, at the Hall home in Fayetteville, April 9, 1939. Orville Hall Jr. Collection (S-2009-60-6)

Christmas Tree Music Box

Donated by Mary Vaughan

Springdale resident Mary Vaughan bought this music box the 1960s. The Christmas tree (which is made of hemp) is rotated to wind up a music box that plays “Jingle Bells.” The box is original and is stamped “Made in Japan, 1962.”

Donated by Mary Vaughan

Springdale resident Mary Vaughan bought this music box the 1960s. The Christmas tree (which is made of hemp) is rotated to wind up a music box that plays “Jingle Bells.” The box is original and is stamped “Made in Japan, 1962.”

Christmas Lights

Donated by Curtis Hornor

The Samuel Ferdinand Hornor family of Lake Village (Chicot County), Arkansas, made their Christmas tree sparkle in the 1920s with this festive set of lights. Note the patriotic dirigible (airship) ornament next to Santa Claus.

The lights were passed down to Hornor’s grandson, Curtis Hornor of Springdale, who donated them to the Shiloh Museum in 1997.

Halloween Lamp

Donated by Lockwood and Annabel Searcy

This ceramic lamp dates to about 1920. We don’t know its history. The only marking is “Germany” on the inside of the lamp base.

Perhaps the lamp was sold by or displayed in Lockwood Searcy’s wholesale grocery store on Emma Avenue in Springdale, or maybe the lamp was a festive decoration in the Searcy house during the Halloween season.

Beaded Pincushion

Donated by Matha Ann (Mrs. Alfred) Lussky and Katherine Lussky Adam

This pincushion belonged to Alma Lussky of Fayetteville. She was the sister of Dr. Alfred Lussky, head of the German Department at the University of Arkansas for many years.The Lusskys were originally from Illinois by way of New York.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s members of the Mohawk, Tuscarora, and Mohegan tribes in upstate New York made pincushions like this and sold them as souvenirs to tourists visiting Niagara Falls and Saratoga.