Tap Handle

Donated by J. T. Wampler

J. T. Wampler has been a photographer for Northwest Arkansas Newspapers for almost two decades. Taking a name from a local creek, he opened Tanglewood Branch Brewing Company located at the intersection of South School Avenue and Fifteenth Street in Fayetteville in September 2011. Initially he sold food made from local ingredients along with local and regional beers. In March 2012 Wampler obtained brewing permits and by the end of May, he was serving in-house brewed beer. However, by the end of 2013, the business was in jeopardy. A fundraising campaign raised over $21,000, allowing Tanglewood to remain open until September 2014..

This tap handle was made for Southside Porter, one of Tanglewood’s most popular brewed beers. Wampler commissioned artist Rae Russell to create original tap handles for all of Tanglewood’s in-house beers. Russell also painted “Bountiful Fayetteville,” the PIGshibition sculpture in front of Fayetteville’s Clinton House Museum.

 

Donated by J. T. Wampler

J. T. Wampler has been a photographer for Northwest Arkansas Newspapers for almost two decades. Taking a name from a local creek, he opened Tanglewood Branch Brewing Company located at the intersection of South School Avenue and Fifteenth Street in Fayetteville in September 2011. Initially he sold food made from local ingredients along with local and regional beers. In March 2012 Wampler obtained brewing permits and by the end of May, he was serving in-house brewed beer. However, by the end of 2013, the business was in jeopardy. A fundraising campaign raised over $21,000, allowing Tanglewood to remain open until September 2014..

This tap handle was made for Southside Porter, one of Tanglewood’s most popular brewed beers. Wampler commissioned artist Rae Russell to create original tap handles for all of Tanglewood’s in-house beers. Russell also painted “Bountiful Fayetteville,” the PIGshibition sculpture in front of Fayetteville’s Clinton House Museum.

 

Heinie’s Steak House

Heinie’s Steak House, Springdale, 1962. Located on Highway 71 near the railroad underpass, this legendary local restaurant was owned and operated by Herman Clint “Heinie” Dierich. Howard Clark, photographer. Caroline Price Clark Collection (S-2002-72-1235)

Heinie’s Steak House, Springdale, 1962. Located on Highway 71 near the railroad underpass, this legendary local restaurant was owned and operated by Herman Clint “Heinie” Dierich. Howard Clark, photographer. Caroline Price Clark Collection (S-2002-72-1235)

Easter Egg

Donated by Virginia Hicks

This papier maché egg probably belonged to twins Mary and Ellen Russell of Harrison (Boone County) in the early 1920s. Mary and Ellen were born to Jesse and Rose Grever Russell in 1917. According to the 1920 census, the Russells lived at 614 West Central Avenue in Harrison. Jesse Russell was an editor of the Boone County Headlight newspaper.  In 1947 he authored Behind These Ozark Hills, a collection of personal reminiscences about life in Carroll and Boone counties.

Germany has a long history of using papier maché eggs to celebrate Easter.  From the late 1800s until the early 1930s, Germany exported empty papier maché eggs to the United States and throughout Europe. The word “GERMANY” stamped inside the egg helps narrow down when it was made. Up until about 1920, papier maché eggs manufactured in Germany were stamped “German” or “Germany.” From 1921 until 1933 they were stamped “German Republic. Following World War II, several stamps were used, including “East Germany,” “German Democratic Republic,” “West Germany,” and “Federal Republic of Germany.”

Donated by Virginia Hicks

This papier maché egg probably belonged to twins Mary and Ellen Russell of Harrison (Boone County) in the early 1920s. Mary and Ellen were born to Jesse and Rose Grever Russell in 1917. According to the 1920 census, the Russells lived at 614 West Central Avenue in Harrison. Jesse Russell was an editor of the Boone County Headlight newspaper.  In 1947 he authored Behind These Ozark Hills, a collection of personal reminiscences about life in Carroll and Boone counties.

Germany has a long history of using papier maché eggs to celebrate Easter.  From the late 1800s until the early 1930s, Germany exported empty papier maché eggs to the United States and throughout Europe. The word “GERMANY” stamped inside the egg helps narrow down when it was made. Up until about 1920, papier maché eggs manufactured in Germany were stamped “German” or “Germany.” From 1921 until 1933 they were stamped “German Republic. Following World War II, several stamps were used, including “East Germany,” “German Democratic Republic,” “West Germany,” and “Federal Republic of Germany.”

Maude Ball and Grandchildren

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball with her grandchildren at the Ball home on Ball Creek (Madison County), 1930s. In the background on the porch is Maude’s husband, Henry Ball. Velda Edens Collection (S-89-92-13)

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball and grandchildren, Madison County, Arkansas, circa 1930s

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball and grandchildren, Madison County, Arkansas, circa 1930s

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball with her grandchildren at the Ball home on Ball Creek (Madison County), 1930s. In the background on the porch is Maude’s husband, Henry Ball. Velda Edens Collection (S-89-92-13)

Fireplace Tool

Donated by Mary Kwas

Gaines Tucker and his wife, Estelle “Essie” Dill West Tucker, used this handmade fireplace poker at their home in the Dean community near Metalton (Carroll County). After Gaines Tucker lost his job during the Great Depression, the Tuckers moved to the Ozarks from North Carolina in the early 1930s. They bought an old cabin on ten acres in Carroll County, where Gaines farmed and Essie ran a second-hand clothing shop out of their home to help make ends meet. Gaines died in 1940 and Essie stayed on in the cabin until her death in 1951.

Closeup of handle and poker end.