Stokenbury Home

Stokenbury home, Elkins (Washington County), circa 1898. Robert Henry Stokenbury and Lydia Johnson Stokenbury stand with their children (from left) Herman, Robbie, and Jessie. The women behind the fence are unidentified. Roberta Reed Collection (S-2001-27-3)

Stokenbury home, Elkins (Washington County), circa 1898. Robert Henry Stokenbury and Lydia Johnson Stokenbury stand with their children (from left) Herman, Robbie, and Jessie. The women behind the fence are unidentified. Roberta Reed Collection (S-2001-27-3)

Powwow Souvenir

1907 powwow souvenirIn October 1907, Collinsville, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), was the site of an event billed as “the last great powwow before [Oklahoma] statehood.” Hosted by Shawnee chief Henry Spybuck, tribal members from throughout Oklahoma came to participate in traditional ceremonies. The attendance of Geronimo, chief of the Apaches, was fuel for much newspaper fodder, as he was being held as a prisoner of war at Fort Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma. According to the Indian Republicannewspaper (Tulsa, Oklahoma), the U.S. government granted Geronimo and other Apache Indians living on Fort Sill’s “military reservation” permission to travel to the powwow, under escort of armed soldiers. Other chiefs at the powwow included Cherokee chief William Charles Rogers,  Osage chief O lo co wah la, Comanche chief Quanah Parker, and Kiowa chief Lone Wolf.

This souvenir badge from the 1907 powwow is part of the Shiloh Museum’s William Guy Howard Collection. Howard (1876-1965) moved to Northwest Arkansas from Nebraska as a young boy. He had a lifetime of public service in Springdale as city attorney during World War I, mayor during World War II, and municipal judge in the 1950s. To many local folks, Howard was known simply as “the Judge.” He was also a collector of prehistoric and Native American artifacts, which he displayed floor-to-ceiling in his home. In 1966 the Springdale City Council voted to purchase Howard’s massive collection of some 10,000 prehistoric and historic artifacts and 260 books and pamphlets on anthropology and archeology. This was the founding collection of the Shiloh Museum.

In October 1907, Collinsville, Indian Territory (now Oklahoma), was the site of an event billed as “the last great powwow before [Oklahoma] statehood.” Hosted by Shawnee chief Henry Spybuck, tribal members from throughout Oklahoma came to participate in traditional ceremonies. The attendance of Geronimo, chief of the Apaches, was fuel for much newspaper fodder, as he was being held as a prisoner of war at Fort Sill in Lawton, Oklahoma. According to the Indian Republican newspaper (Tulsa, Oklahoma), the U.S. government granted Geronimo and other Apache Indians living on Fort Sill’s “military reservation” permission to travel to the powwow, under escort of armed soldiers. Other chiefs at the powwow included Cherokee chief William Charles Rogers,  Osage chief O lo co wah la, Comanche chief Quanah Parker, and Kiowa chief Lone Wolf.

This souvenir badge from the 1907 powwow is part of the Shiloh Museum’s William Guy Howard Collection. Howard (1876-1965) moved to Northwest Arkansas from Nebraska as a young boy. He had a lifetime of public service in Springdale as city attorney during World War I, mayor during World War II, and municipal judge in the 1950s. To many local folks, Howard was known simply as “the Judge.” He was also a collector of prehistoric and Native American artifacts, which he displayed floor-to-ceiling in his home. In 1966 the Springdale City Council voted to purchase Howard’s massive collection of some 10,000 prehistoric and historic artifacts and 260 books and pamphlets on anthropology and archeology. This was the founding collection of the Shiloh Museum.

Handkerchief

Donated by Lillian Howard

This handkerchief belonged to Alpha “Alphie” Williams, who was born near War Eagle (Madison County) in 1907, the youngest of eight children. The Williams family moved to the south Madison County community of St. Paul, where Alpha lived until she was in her twenties. She taught school for a time in Madison County, then graduated from the University of Arkansas and attended graduate school at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Services Administration. Williams went on to become a social worker in Indiana, Missouri, and Arkansas. Her career also included working for the United Service Organizations (USO) and also for the Arkansas state welfare system, where she specialized in cases involving abused children.

Alpha Williams eventually came back home to south Madison County, where she lived until her death in 1993.

Donated by Lillian Howard

This handkerchief belonged to Alpha “Alphie” Williams, who was born near War Eagle (Madison County) in 1907, the youngest of eight children. The Williams family moved to the south Madison County community of St. Paul, where Alpha lived until she was in her twenties. She taught school for a time in Madison County, then graduated from the University of Arkansas and attended graduate school at the University of Chicago’s School of Social Services Administration.  Williams went on to become a social worker in Indiana, Missouri, and Arkansas. Her career also included working for the United Service Organizations (USO) and also for the Arkansas state welfare system, where she specialized in cases involving abused children.

Alpha Williams eventually came back home to south Madison County, where she lived until her death in 1993.

Mustain Family

Thomas and Matilda Burnett Mustain family at their home near the Silent Grove community (Benton County), circa 1910. From left: Thomas, Matilda, Stella, Bertha. Carole Byerly Collection (S-2014-74-7)

Thomas and Matilda Burnett Mustain family at their home near the Silent Grove community (Benton County), circa 1910. From left: Thomas, Matilda, Stella, Bertha. Carole Byerly Collection (S-2014-74-7)