Maude Ball and Grandchildren

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball with her grandchildren at the Ball home on Ball Creek (Madison County), 1930s. In the background on the porch is Maude’s husband, Henry Ball. Velda Edens Collection (S-89-92-13)

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball and grandchildren, Madison County, Arkansas, circa 1930s

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball and grandchildren, Madison County, Arkansas, circa 1930s

Lillie Maude Rogers Ball with her grandchildren at the Ball home on Ball Creek (Madison County), 1930s. In the background on the porch is Maude’s husband, Henry Ball. Velda Edens Collection (S-89-92-13)

Fireplace Tool

Donated by Mary Kwas

Gaines Tucker and his wife, Estelle “Essie” Dill West Tucker, used this handmade fireplace poker at their home in the Dean community near Metalton (Carroll County). After Gaines Tucker lost his job during the Great Depression, the Tuckers moved to the Ozarks from North Carolina in the early 1930s. They bought an old cabin on ten acres in Carroll County, where Gaines farmed and Essie ran a second-hand clothing shop out of their home to help make ends meet. Gaines died in 1940 and Essie stayed on in the cabin until her death in 1951.

Closeup of handle and poker end.

Nick Clemmons

Fayetteville resident Nick Clemmons, circa 1910. We find Clemmons on the 1880 census, a 40-year-old widower living in Fayetteville with nine children and grandchildren. His occupation is listed as “laborer.”
 
Perhaps Nick Clemmons’ wife was Millie Clemmons, a Fayetteville woman listed on the 1880 mortality scheduled as having died of cholera in 1879.
 
The 1900 census shows Clemmons living in Fayetteville with his daughter Rindy and her family.
 
The last time we find Nick Clemmons on the census is in 1910. He is living alone at 235 E. Huntsville Road in Fayetteville, near the present-day intersection of Huntsville Road and Combs Avenue.
 
Burch Grabill, photographer. Washington County Historical Society Collection (P-172)

 

Nick Clemmons, Fayetteville, Arkansas, circa 1900

Rev. Peter and Martha Carnahan, Bentonville, Arkansas, 1890
Fayetteville resident Nick Clemmons, circa 1910. We find Clemmons on the 1880 census, a 40-year-old widower living in Fayetteville with nine children and grandchildren. His occupation is listed as “laborer.”
 
Perhaps Nick Clemmons’ wife was Millie Clemmons, a Fayetteville woman listed on the 1880 mortality scheduled as having died of cholera in 1879.
 
The 1900 census shows Clemmons living in Fayetteville with his daughter Rindy and her family.
 
The last time we find Nick Clemmons on the census is in 1910. He is living alone at 235 E. Huntsville Road in Fayetteville, near the present-day intersection of Huntsville Road and Combs Avenue.
 
Burch Grabill, photographer. Washington County Historical Society Collection (P-172)

 

Hardness Tester

Donated by the Ball CorporationRockwell Hardness Tester

The Rockwell hardness tester was used to determine the strength, or “hardness,” of metal. Hardness was measured by attempting to put a dent into metal with increasing pressure, with the corresponding hardness number indicated on a gauge. The hardness tester seen here used a conical diamond to make the dent. 

The history behind this particular tester is not completely known. Most recently it served at Heekin Can Company in Springdale. However, the tester has a metal tag identifying it as property of the “Defense Plant Corporation” or DPC. The DPC was created in 1940 to help with the war effort during World War II. Various wartime federal agencies would make a request for manufactured goods and the DPC would make sure that factories were able to deliver. Over six years the DPC distributed over nine billion dollars on 2,300 projects across forty-six states and overseas. Most of that money was spent building and equipping new factories and mills, which were primarily leased to private companies.

The metal tag also has “Frigidaire” engraved on it. Frigidaire Appliance Company made many components during World War II, including propellers, fuel tanks, and machine guns.

Metal tag on hardness tester.

Heekin Can Company was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio, by James Heekin in 1901. Son James J. Heekin took over the business in 1904 following his father’s passing. A second plant was added in 1915, and Heekin went on to become the largest regional manufacturer of metal food containers in the U.S., with  factories in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

In the 1940s, Springdale was the center of Northwest Arkansas’s agricultural and canning industries. Heekin decided to locate a plant in Springdale to provide packing cans for locally processed fruits and vegetables. On June 4, 1949, the grand opening of Springdale’s Heekin Can Company was met with much fanfare, including speeches by Heekin president Daniel Heekin, Frisco Railroad vice president John Payne, and Arkansas highway commissioner Orval Faubus. The Springdale High School Band and Slim Picken’s Famous Western Band provided musical entertainment as some 4,000 visitors toured the new factory. Free soda pop and fried chicken box lunches were provided for all in attendance. 

Heekin remained under family control until 1965 when it was sold to Diamond International to avoid a possible hostile takeover. In 1982 Heekin was sold as an independent company to Wesray Holding Corporation following a hostile takeover of Diamond. Three years later Heekin went public. Ball Corporation acquired Heekin in 1993. Phaseout of operations at the Springdale facility began in 2019, with the final plant closure expected sometime in 2021.

Learn more about Springdale’s Heekin Canning Company and the local canning industry in our Canned Gold online exhibit.

Rockwell Hardness Tester

Donated by the Ball Corporation

The Rockwell hardness tester was used to determine the strength, or “hardness,” of metal. Hardness was measured by attempting to put a dent into metal with increasing pressure, with the corresponding hardness number indicated on a gauge. The hardness tester seen here used a conical diamond to make the dent. 

The history behind this particular tester is not completely known. Most recently it served at Heekin Can Company in Springdale. However, the tester has a metal tag identifying it as property of the “Defense Plant Corporation” or DPC. The DPC was created in 1940 to help with the war effort during World War II. Various wartime federal agencies would make a request for manufactured goods and the DPC would make sure that factories were able to deliver. Over six years the DPC distributed over nine billion dollars on 2,300 projects across forty-six states and overseas. Most of that money was spent building and equipping new factories and mills, which were primarily leased to private companies.

Metal tag on hardness tester.

The metal tag also has “Frigidaire” engraved on it. Frigidaire Appliance Company made many components during World War II, including propellers, fuel tanks, and machine guns.

Heekin Can Company was founded in Cincinnati, Ohio, by James Heekin in 1901. Son James J. Heekin took over the business in 1904 following his father’s passing. A second plant was added in 1915, and Heekin went on to become the largest regional manufacturer of metal food containers in the U.S., with  factories in Arkansas, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

In the 1940s, Springdale was the center of Northwest Arkansas’s agricultural and canning industries. Heekin decided to locate a plant in Springdale to provide packing cans for locally processed fruits and vegetables. On June 4, 1949, the grand opening of Springdale’s Heekin Can Company was met with much fanfare, including speeches by Heekin president Daniel Heekin, Frisco Railroad vice president John Payne, and Arkansas highway commissioner Orval Faubus. The Springdale High School Band and Slim Picken’s Famous Western Band provided musical entertainment as some 4,000 visitors toured the new factory. Free soda pop and fried chicken box lunches were provided for all in attendance. 

Heekin remained under family control until 1965 when it was sold to Diamond International to avoid a possible hostile takeover. In 1982 Heekin was sold as an independent company to Wesray Holding Corporation following a hostile takeover of Diamond. Three years later Heekin went public. Ball Corporation acquired Heekin in 1993. Phaseout of operations at the Springdale facility began in 2019, with the final plant closure expected sometime in 2021.

Learn more about Springdale’s Heekin Canning Company and the local canning industry in our Canned Gold online exhibit.

The Carnahans

Rev. Peter Carnahan (1838-1926) and his wife, Martha Jane Buchanan Carnahan (1841-1922), at their home in Bentonville, 1890. Both Peter and Martha were descendants of pioneer Cumberland Presbyterian families who founded the Washington County settlement of Cane Hill in 1827. Rev. Carnahan became a minister in 1866 and served congregations in and around Cane Hill. In 1870 the Carnahan family moved to Bentonville, where Rev. Carnahan pastored the Presbyterian church for fourteen years.

Mildred Carnahan Collection (S-98-2-584)

Rev. Peter and Martha Carnahan, Bentonville, Arkansas, 1890
Rev. Peter and Martha Carnahan, Bentonville, Arkansas, 1890

Rev. Peter Carnahan (1838-1926) and his wife, Martha Jane Buchanan Carnahan (1841-1922), at their home in Bentonville, 1890. Both Peter and Martha were descendants of pioneer Cumberland Presbyterian families who founded the Washington County settlement of Cane Hill in 1827. Rev. Carnahan became a minister in 1866 and served congregations in and around Cane Hill. In 1870 the Carnahan family moved to Bentonville, where Rev. Carnahan pastored the Presbyterian church for fourteen years.

Mildred Carnahan Collection (S-98-2-584)