“Cathedral Window” Quilt

Quilt detail

Donated by Mary Jo Myers

This circa 1970 “Cathedral Window” quilt was made by Charlotte Shepard (1890–1977) of Fayetteville.

“Cathedral Window” became a popular quilt pattern in the mid-1900s. A Library of Congress article on Virginia quilter Ila Patton notes, “Unlike typical quilts in which the top is constructed and then joined with two other layers to form the finished quilt, the “Cathedral Window” is formed by folding and sewing squares of fabric together. Contrasting squares of fabric are inserted across the seams, producing an interlocking curved design. A “Cathedral Window” does not require quilting, which is considered an advantage by many quilters, particularly those with poor eyesight or limited mobility.” From Blue Ridge Quilters: Ila Patton

Donated by Mary Jo Myers

This circa 1970 “Cathedral Window” quilt was made by Charlotte Shepard (1890–1977) of Fayetteville.

Cathedral Window became a popular quilt pattern in the mid-1900s. A Library of Congress article on Virginia quilter Ila Patton notes, “Unlike typical quilts in which the top is constructed and then joined with two other layers to form the finished quilt, the “Cathedral Window” is formed by folding and sewing squares of fabric together. Contrasting squares of fabric are inserted across the seams, producing an interlocking curved design. A “Cathedral Window” does not require quilting, which is considered an advantage by many quilters, particularly those with poor eyesight or limited mobility.” From Blue Ridge Quilters: Ila Patton

Quilt detail

Fishback School

Fishback School (Washington County), circa 1905. Fishback School was established in 1885 as Washington County School District 68. At that time, the school was about two miles southeast of Springdale, in an area known for its fruit orchards. Two families, the Grahams and the Boyds, donated one-half acre each from their adjoining orchards as a location for the schoolhouse, a one-room wood frame building.

According to former Fishback student Truman Stamps, the school was named for William Meade Fishback, a prominent Fort Smith attorney and legislator who served as governor of Arkansas from 1893-1895. Like most rural schools, grades one through eight were offered at Fishback. The school was consolidated with the Springdale public school system in 1949.

Dolores Stamps Collection (S-2001-49-198)

Fishback School (Washington County), circa 1905. Fishback School was established in 1885 as Washington County School District 68. At that time, the school was about two miles southeast of Springdale, in an area known for its fruit orchards. Two families, the Grahams and the Boyds, donated one-half acre each from their adjoining orchards as a location for the schoolhouse, a one-room wood frame building.

According to former Fishback student Truman Stamps, the school was named for William Meade Fishback, a prominent Fort Smith attorney and legislator who served as governor of Arkansas from 1893-1895. Like most rural schools, grades one through eight were offered at Fishback. The school was consolidated with the Springdale public school system in 1949.

Dolores Stamps Collection (S-2001-49-198)

Pocket Watch

Waltham pocket watchDonated by Opal Jones

This 1897 pocket watch made by the American Waltham Watch Company. When A. L. “Lee” Gregg asked Elizabeth “Betty” Jones to marry him in the late 1890s, she asked for a pocket watch instead of a wedding ring. The couple, both from Springdale, married on November 30, 1897.

Betty Jones Gregg was aunt to Harvey Jones (founder of Springdale-based Jones Truck Lines) and his sister, Opal.

Waltham pocket watch

Donated by Opal Jones

This 1897 pocket watch made by the American Waltham Watch Company. When A. L. “Lee” Gregg asked Elizabeth “Betty” Jones to marry him in the late 1890s, she asked for a pocket watch instead of a wedding ring. The couple, both from Springdale, married on November 30, 1897.

Betty Jones Gregg was aunt to Harvey Jones (founder of Springdale-based Jones Truck Lines) and his sister, Opal.

Red, White, and Blue Dress

Red, white, and blue dress, circa 1910Donated by Mary Brashears Mullen

Jessie Stewart (1892-1980) showed her patriotic spirit when she wore this dress to the annual reunion at St. Paul (Madison County). The dress dates to about 1901, so Jessie would have been about  ten years old when she wore it.

Jessie was born in Hazard, Kentucky, to James M. and Margaret Elizabeth Brashears Stewart. In 1895, the family moved to St. Paul where James ran a mercantile. Jessie attended school in St. Paul, then studied music at the University of Arkansas. Following graduation from college, she taught school in Oklahoma and in the Northwest Arkansas communities of Bentonville and Cave Springs. In 1925 she married Thomas Jacob “Jake” Gilstrap, a lumber yard operator she first met in St. Paul. Jake opened his first lumber yard in Combs (Madison County) in 1915 and went on to own lumber yards in Texas, Kansas, and Northwest Arkansas.

When Jake died in 1946, Jessie moved to Bentonville to run the family lumber business there. She became a successful businesswoman, well-known in the retail lumber trade as “Lumber Lou,” whose columns appeared regularly in trade publications for over thirty years.

Red, white, and blue dress, circa 1910

Donated by Mary Brashears Mullen

Jessie Stewart (1892-1980) showed her patriotic spirit when she wore this dress to the annual reunion at St. Paul (Madison County). The dress dates to about 1901, so Jessie would have been about  ten years old when she wore it.

Jessie was born in Hazard, Kentucky, to James M. and Margaret Elizabeth Brashears Stewart. In 1895, the family moved to St. Paul where James ran a mercantile. Jessie attended school in St. Paul, then studied music at the University of Arkansas. Following graduation from college, she taught school in Oklahoma and in the Northwest Arkansas communities of Bentonville and Cave Springs. In 1925 she married Thomas Jacob “Jake” Gilstrap, a lumber yard operator she first met in St. Paul. Jake opened his first lumber yard in Combs (Madison County) in 1915 and went on to own lumber yards in Texas, Kansas, and Northwest Arkansas.

When Jake died in 1946, Jessie moved to Bentonville to run the family lumber business there. She became a successful businesswoman, well-known in the retail lumber trade as “Lumber Lou,” whose columns appeared regularly in trade publications for over thirty years.