Eaton Family

Elbie and Lillian Eaton family, early 1940s, Boston (Madison County), Arkansas.Eaton family at the Boston (Madison County) school and church building, early 1940s. From left: Lillian Bennett Eaton holding Kenneth, Elbie L.”Hoss” Eaton holding Levell, Katherine “Kay” Eaton standing in front. Otto Bennett Collection (S- 2000-64-380)

Elbie and Lillian Eaton family, early 1940s, Boston (Madison County), Arkansas.

Eaton family at the Boston (Madison County) school and church building, early 1940s. From left: Lillian Bennett Eaton holding Kenneth, Elbie L.”Hoss” Eaton holding Levell, Katherine “Kay” Eaton standing in front. Otto Bennett Collection (S-2000-64-380)

Red, White, and Blue Dress

Donated by Mary Brashears Mullen

Red, white, and blue dress, circa 1910Jessie Stewart (1892-1980) showed her patriotic spirit when she wore this dress to the annual reunion at St. Paul (Madison County). The dress dates to about 1901, so Jessie would have been about  ten years old when she wore it.

Jessie was born in Hazard, Kentucky, to James M. and Margaret Elizabeth Brashears Stewart. In 1895, the family moved to St. Paul where James ran a mercantile. Jessie attended school in St. Paul, then studied music at the University of Arkansas. Following graduation from college, she taught school in Oklahoma and in the Northwest Arkansas communities of Bentonville and Cave Springs. In 1925 she married Thomas Jacob “Jake” Gilstrap, a lumber yard operator she first met in St. Paul. Jake opened his first lumber yard in Combs (Madison County) in 1915 and went on to own lumber yards in Texas, Kansas, and Northwest Arkansas.

When Jake died in 1946, Jessie moved to Bentonville to run the family lumber business there. She became a successful businesswoman, well-known in the retail lumber trade as “Lumber Lou,” whose columns appeared regularly in trade publications for over thirty years.

Red, white, and blue dress, circa 1910

Donated by Mary Brashears Mullen

Jessie Stewart (1892-1980) showed her patriotic spirit when she wore this dress to the annual reunion at St. Paul (Madison County). The dress dates to about 1901, so Jessie would have been about  ten years old when she wore it.

Jessie was born in Hazard, Kentucky, to James M. and Margaret Elizabeth Brashears Stewart. In 1895, the family moved to St. Paul where James ran a mercantile. Jessie attended school in St. Paul, then studied music at the University of Arkansas. Following graduation from college, she taught school in Oklahoma and in the Northwest Arkansas communities of Bentonville and Cave Springs. In 1925 she married Thomas Jacob “Jake” Gilstrap, a lumber yard operator she first met in St. Paul. Jake opened his first lumber yard in Combs (Madison County) in 1915 and went on to own lumber yards in Texas, Kansas, and Northwest Arkansas.

When Jake died in 1946, Jessie moved to Bentonville to run the family lumber business there. She became a successful businesswoman, well-known in the retail lumber trade as “Lumber Lou,” whose columns appeared regularly in trade publications for over thirty years.

Picking Beans

Picking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs, Arkansas, in 1955

Picking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs (Benton County), July 1, 1955. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bauer Collection (S-92-144)

Standing, from left: Mrs. Bob Anderson, Bob Anderson, Geneva McGarrah Bauer, unidentified, Tom Anderson, Tom Alverson, Tom Alverson (bushel basket on shoulder). Crouched, from left: Pearl McGarrah, Jack Bauer.

Geneva Bauer (the woman looking at the camera) is holding a list of basket weights used to estimate the pounds of beans picked. Workers was paid ten cents per pound of beans. This truckload was headed for Dallas to fresh-market buyers.

 

Picking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs, Arkansas, in 1955

Picking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs (Benton County), July 1, 1955. Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bauer Collection (S-92-144)

Standing, from left: Mrs. Bob Anderson, Bob Anderson, Geneva McGarrah Bauer, unidentified, Tom Anderson, Tom Alverson, Tom Alverson (bushel basket on shoulder). Crouched, from left: Pearl McGarrah, Jack Bauer.

Geneva Bauer (the woman looking at the camera) is holding a list of basket weights used to estimate the pounds of beans picked. Workers was paid ten cents per pound of beans. This truckload was headed for Dallas to fresh-market buyers.

 

Ozark Nuthead Dolls

Ozark nuthead dolls“Hillbilly Wedding,” a hickory nut doll diorama, was made by Ben Smith and his wife, Ethel. The Smiths, who lived in the Fayetteville/Springdale area, made dolls and other souvenir items in the late 1940s which were sold locally and by mail order. The Smiths’ son Lavon helped with the souvenir business while attending the University of Arkansas, where he studied art.

The Shiloh Museum purchased “Hillbilly Wedding” from doll collector Hilda Geuther of Eureka Springs.

Ozark nuthead dolls

“Hillbilly Wedding,” a hickory nut doll diorama, was made by Ben Smith and his wife, Ethel. The Smiths, who lived in the Fayetteville/Springdale area, made dolls and other souvenir items in the late 1940s which were sold locally and by mail order. The Smiths’ son Lavon helped with the souvenir business while attending the University of Arkansas, where he studied art.

The Shiloh Museum purchased “Hillbilly Wedding” from doll collector Hilda Geuther of Eureka Springs.

Brogdon and Hazel Produce Warehouse

Brogdon and Hazel produce wholesale warehouse on Emma Avenue, Springdale, Arkansas, circa 1939

Brogdon and Hazel produce wholesale warehouse on Emma Avenue, Springdale, circa 1939. Natalie Henry, photographer. Martha Hall Collection (S-96-112-15)

Forrest Hazel (1891–1981) and Preston Brogdon (1899–1951) ran a bustling wholesale produce market in downtown Springdale for more than thirty years, during the town’s heyday as an agricultural hub where local farmers sold a variety of crops which were shipped out via rail or processed locally.

In the late 1930s, artist Natalie Henry was hired to paint a WPA mural for the Springdale post office. She spent a few days in Springdale taking photos as a way to inform her artwork, including this street scene in from of Brogdon and Hazel’s warehouse.  Today, Natalie Henry’s mural, “Local Industries,” hangs in the Shiloh Museum. Learn more about the mural under the “New Deal” section of our 1920 to 1950 online exhibit. Martha Hall Collection (S-87-37-5)