Fishback School

Fishback School (Washington County), circa 1905. Fishback School was established in 1885 as Washington County School District 68. At that time, the school was about two miles southeast of Springdale, in an area known for its fruit orchards. Two families, the Grahams and the Boyds, donated one-half acre each from their adjoining orchards as a location for the schoolhouse, a one-room wood frame building.

According to former Fishback student Truman Stamps, the school was named for William Meade Fishback, a prominent Fort Smith attorney and legislator who served as governor of Arkansas from 1893-1895. Like most rural schools, grades one through eight were offered at Fishback. The school was consolidated with the Springdale public school system in 1949.

Dolores Stamps Collection (S-2001-49-198)

Fishback School (Washington County), circa 1905. Fishback School was established in 1885 as Washington County School District 68. At that time, the school was about two miles southeast of Springdale, in an area known for its fruit orchards. Two families, the Grahams and the Boyds, donated one-half acre each from their adjoining orchards as a location for the schoolhouse, a one-room wood frame building.

According to former Fishback student Truman Stamps, the school was named for William Meade Fishback, a prominent Fort Smith attorney and legislator who served as governor of Arkansas from 1893-1895. Like most rural schools, grades one through eight were offered at Fishback. The school was consolidated with the Springdale public school system in 1949.

Dolores Stamps Collection (S-2001-49-198)

Eaton Family

Eaton family at the Boston (Madison County) school and church building, early 1940s. From left: Lillian Bennett Eaton holding Kenneth, Elbie L.”Hoss” Eaton holding Levell, Katherine “Kay” Eaton standing in front.

Otto Bennett Collection (S- 2000-64-380)

Eaton family at the Boston (Madison County) school and church building, early 1940s. From left: Lillian Bennett Eaton holding Kenneth, Elbie L.”Hoss” Eaton holding Levell, Katherine “Kay” Eaton standing in front.

Otto Bennett Collection (S- 2000-64-380)

Picking Beans

Picking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs (Benton County), July 1, 1955. Standing, from left: Mrs. Bob Anderson, Bob Anderson, Geneva McGarrah Bauer, unidentified, Tom Anderson, Tom Alverson, Tom Alverson (bushel basket on shoulder). Crouched, from left: Pearl McGarrah, Jack Bauer.

Geneva Bauer (the woman looking at the camera) is holding a list of basket weights used to estimate the pounds of beans picked. Workers was paid ten cents per pound of beans. This truckload was headed for Dallas to fresh-market buyers.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bauer Collection (S-92-144)

PIcking beans at the McGarrah farm near Siloam Springs (Benton County), July 1, 1955. Standing, from left: Mrs. Bob Anderson, Bob Anderson, Geneva McGarrah Bauer, unidentified, Tom Anderson, Tom Alverson, Tom Alverson (bushel basket on shoulder). Crouched, from left: Pearl McGarrah, Jack Bauer.

Geneva Bauer (the woman looking at the camera) is holding a list of basket weights used to estimate the pounds of beans picked. Workers was paid ten cents per pound of beans. This truckload was headed for Dallas to fresh-market buyers.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Bauer Collection (S-92-144)

Brogdon and Hazel Produce Warehouse

Brogdon and Hazel produce warehouse on Emma Avenue, Springdale, circa 1939. Forrest Hazel and Preston Brogdon ran a bustling wholesale produce market for more than thirty years, during Springdale’s heyday as an agricultural hub where crops which were shipped out or processed locally.

In the 1930s, artist Natalie Henry was hired to paint a WPA mural for Springdale’s post office. She spent time in Springdale taking photos as a way to inform her artwork, including this scene at Brogdon and Hazel’s warehouse.

Today, Natalie Henry’s mural, “Local Industries,” hangs in the Shiloh Museum. Learn more about the mural under the “New Deal” section of our 1920 to 1950 online exhibit.

Natalie Henry, photographer. Martha Hall Collection (S-96-112-15)

Brogdon and Hazel produce wholesale warehouse on Emma Avenue, Springdale, Arkansas, circa 1939

Brogdon and Hazel produce warehouse on Emma Avenue, Springdale, circa 1939. Forrest Hazel and Preston Brogdon ran a bustling wholesale produce market for more than thirty years, during Springdale’s heyday as an agricultural hub where crops which were shipped out or processed locally.

In the 1930s, artist Natalie Henry was hired to paint a WPA mural for Springdale’s post office. She spent time in Springdale taking photos as a way to inform her artwork, including this scene at Brogdon and Hazel’s warehouse.

Today, Natalie Henry’s mural, “Local Industries,” hangs in the Shiloh Museum. Learn more about the mural under the “New Deal” section of our 1920 to 1950 online exhibit.

Natalie Henry, photographer. Martha Hall Collection (S-96-112-15)

J. A. Steele General Store

Joseph Albert Steele (1866–1931), a lifelong resident of Elm Springs (Benton County), was a storekeeper and buyer and seller of local farm products. In the May 6, 1917, issue of the Egg Reporter magazine, Steele noted a downturn in the number of eggs being brought to his store, lamenting,”There is no agitation for increasing the poultry and egg production shown in this section.”

Russell Charlesworth and Frances Reeves Collection (S-87-37-5)

Joseph Albert Steele (1866–1931), a lifelong resident of Elm Springs (Benton County), was a storekeeper and buyer and seller of local farm products. In the May 6, 1917, issue of the Egg Reporter magazine, Steele noted a downturn in the number of eggs being brought to his store, lamenting,”There is no agitation for increasing the poultry and egg production shown in this section.”

Russell Charlesworth and Frances Reeves Collection (S-87-37-5)