Sarah Morton

Sarah Morton, Fayetteville, Arkansas, circa 1910Sarah Morton, Fayetteville, circa 1910. According to the 1910 census, Sarah Morton was born in 1855 in Tennessee. Her occupation is listed as “washing” for “private families.” Her husband, Alfred Morton, also a Tennessee native, was born in 1850. His occupation is listed as “odd jobs.” Also in the Martin household in 1910 was their 14-year-old grandson, Leslie Howard. Washington County Historical Society Collection (P-4602)

Stokenbury Home

Stokenbury home, Elkins (Washington County), circa 1898. Robert Henry Stokenbury and Lydia Johnson Stokenbury stand with their children (from left) Herman, Robbie, and Jessie. The women behind the fence are unidentified. Roberta Reed Collection (S-2001-27-3)

Stokenbury home, Elkins (Washington County), circa 1898. Robert Henry Stokenbury and Lydia Johnson Stokenbury stand with their children (from left) Herman, Robbie, and Jessie. The women behind the fence are unidentified. Roberta Reed Collection (S-2001-27-3)

Mustain Family

Thomas and Matilda Burnett Mustain family at their home near the Silent Grove community (Benton County), circa 1910. From left: Thomas, Matilda, Stella, Bertha. Carole Byerly Collection (S-2014-74-7)

Thomas and Matilda Burnett Mustain family at their home near the Silent Grove community (Benton County), circa 1910. From left: Thomas, Matilda, Stella, Bertha. Carole Byerly Collection (S-2014-74-7)

Pumping Water from the Pond

Tom Farish (right) and an identified worker at a irrigation pond in Lowell (Benton County), July 1946.

The portable pump was sending much-needed water to fields of green beans. Farish (1897–1946) and Joe Steele were co-owners of Steele Canning Company, regional processors of beans, tomatoes, and spinach. Maudine Sanders Collection (S-2006-132-152)

Tom Farish (right) and an identified worker at a irrigation pond in Lowell (Benton County), July 1946.

The portable pump was sending much-needed water to fields of green beans. Farish (1897–1946) and Joe Steele were co-owners of Steele Canning Company, regional processors of beans, tomatoes, and spinach. Maudine Sanders Collection (S-2006-132-152)

Frisco Coaling Tower

Frisco Railroad coaling tower at Fayette Junction, a switchyard that was located near the present-day intersection of Cato Springs Road and Vale Avenue in south Fayetteville, early 1900s. Virginia Threet Collection (S-88-156-11)

Coaling towers were a necessary fixture along railroads during the era of coal-powered steam locomotives. Coal was carried on the train in a special car called a “tender.” When the tender needed to be refilled, the engineer positioned the train so that the tender was parked under the tower chutes at the coaling tower. The chutes were then lowered and coal was released into the tender. In the 1950s, diesel replaced coal as the fuel of choice for locomotives, and coaling towers fell out of use.

Frisco Railroad coaling tower at Fayette Junction near Fayetteville, Arkansas, early 1900s.Frisco Railroad coaling tower at Fayette Junction, a switchyard that was located near the present-day intersection of Cato Springs Road and Vale Avenue in south Fayetteville, early 1900s. Virginia Threet Collection (S-88-156-11)

Coaling towers were a necessary fixture along railroads during the era of coal-powered steam locomotives. Coal was carried on the train in a special car called a “tender.” When the tender needed to be refilled, the engineer positioned the train so that the tender was parked under the tower chutes at the coaling tower. The chutes were then lowered and coal was released into the tender. In the 1950s, diesel replaced coal as the fuel of choice for locomotives, and coaling towers fell out of use.