Child’s Rocking Chair

Jack Elzey with the family cats, dog, and child’s rocking chair, Madison County, circa 1910. William H. Chenault Collection (S-2005-37-62)

Donated by William H. Chenault

This child’s rocking chair first belonged to Netia Burkett Elzey (1888-1965), who lived her whole life near the Madison County community of Marble. Netia married Walter Harrison “Watt” Elzey (1885-1958) in 1906. The Elzeys farmed and raised three children—Jack, Lloyd, and Viola.

Watt Elzey liked to take photographs in his spare time, and he often used Netia’s little rocker as a prop in family photos. The chair suffered a broken leg in the 1940s or 1950s, but was later repaired by Netia and Watt’s son Lloyd.

 

Donated by William H. Chenault

This child’s rocking chair first belonged to Netia Burkett Elzey (1888-1965), who lived her whole life near the Madison County community of Marble. Netia married Walter Harrison “Watt” Elzey (1885-1958) in 1906. The Elzeys farmed and raised three children—Jack, Lloyd, and Viola.

Watt Elzey liked to take photographs in his spare time, and he often used Netia’s little rocker as a prop in family photos. The chair suffered a broken leg in the 1940s or 1950s, but was later repaired by Netia and Watt’s son Lloyd.

Jack Elzey with the family cats, dog, and child’s rocking chair, Madison County, circa 1910. William H. Chenault Collection (S-2005-37-62)

Fork and Spoon Set

Donated by Paula Thompson

This fancy silverware no doubt saw its share of holiday meals. The serving fork is silverplate and was from the 1847 Rogers Brothers line manufactured by Meriden Britannia Company ( Meriden, CT). The pattern name is “Assyrian Head,” designed and patented by Henry V. Hirschfeld in 1886. The serving spoon, part of a set, is sterling silver made by Gorham Manufacturing Company (Providence, RI) in the “Fontainebleau” pattern, designed by Gorham’s leading designer, Antoine Heller. It was also introduced in 1886.

The flatware pieces come from the Robert M. Thompson household of Rogers (Benton County). Priscilla Cabinette Thomas of Virginia was a violin and piano teacher and church organist In the late 1800s when she met Robert Marion Thompson, a minister from Kentucky. The couple was married around 1896 and had two sons. The Thompson family moved to Rogers, Arkansas, about 1900 where Robert preached at the First Christian Church and other nearby churches.

Flask

Donated by Pauline Lancaster

This yellow earthenware flask with a Rockingham glaze was made by Lyman Fenton & Co., Bennington, Vermont, sometime between 1849-1858. The spine of the “book” boasts the tongue-in-cheek title, Departed Spirits. The letter G is stamped under the title.

According to the donor, it was left behind by a hobo as payment for a night’s stay in a barn.

Fashion Clock

Donated by Zelmer and Norene Teague

Complete with Seth Thomas clockworks, this clock was made by Southern Calendar Clock Company of St. Louis in 1877. The upper dial keeps time; the lower dial is a perpetual calendar (it automatically adjusts for months of different lengths and indicates February 29 in each leap year).

John Sisemore, a farmer and Civil War veteran who lived near the Madison County community of Japton, bought this clock in 1877. According to Sisemore family lore, John was one of three people in Northwest Arkansas that year who purchased this brand of clock. The other buyers were the Johnson family who owned Johnson Mill in Washington County, and an unknown woman in Fayetteville.

John Sisemore’s clock was used by Sisemore family and descendants until 2008, when Zelmer “Teb” and Norene Teague donated it to the Shiloh Museum.

Egg Basket

Donated by Billy Dean and Catherine Foster

This basket belonged to Elnora Coralee Webb Fritts (1865-1962). She was born at Durham (Washington County) and lived there always. Elnora and her husband, Lon, had four children: Herman, Lillie, Hattie, and Maggie.

Billy Dean Foster, Elnora’s grandson by her daughter, Maggie, remembers filling this basket with eggs when he was a little boy, and what a heavy load it was when he carried it!

Transferware Plate

Donated by Melvin and Lucille Ferguson

This transferware plate belonged to Hiram Hamilton and Ida May Lierly Tresner, who lived in the Round Mountain community east of Fayetteville. Their daughter, Laura Pearl Tresner Ferguson, recalled that the plate sat on the family dining table and was always used for serving crackers.

According to the Transferware Collectors Club website, “Transferware is the term givento pottery that has had a pattern applied by transferring the print from a copper plate to a specially sized paper and finally to the pottery body. While produced primarily on earthenware, transfer prints are also found on ironstone, porcelain and bone china.”

The plate was manufactured by Dunn Bennett & Company of England, a producer of stoneware items for the American market in the late 1880s and early 1900s. Shaftesbury is the pattern name.

Dun Bennett & Co. mark 

Tresner family, circa 1904. Back row, from left: Myrtle, Harvey, Orlando. Front row, from left: Ida May holding Tot, Laura Pearl, Hiram holding Jim. W. H. Albertson, photographer. Courtesy Melvin and Lucille Ferguson