Woodcarving

Donated by Kenneth Wickham

Born near Cassville, Missouri, Roy Harris (1893–1977) started carving in 1959 at the age of 65. He specialized in farm-related miniatures and exhibited at the War Eagle Craft Fair (Benton County) for several years.

In 1964 Harris and his wife moved to Frost’s High Sky Inn, an old tourist court east of Springdale. Due to failing eyesight he stopped whittling around 1970.

The donor of this carving burned the words “Arkansas War Eagle” and “1966” (not visible in the photo) on the piece.

Iroquois Beadwork Frame

Gertie Copening at Hindsville (Madison County), 1940s. Jim Vaughan Collection (S-96-126-3)

Donated by Jim Vaughan

This decorative frame belong to Gertie Copening (1881-1962) of Hindsville (Madison County). The message on the postcard in the frame reads, “May Christmas peace keep winter from the heart.”

The frame is an example of Iroquois raised beadwork, a tradition originated by the Iroquois in western New York in the late 1700s. The beadwork became popular in the 1800s, when frames, pincushions, needle cases, and other items were sold as souvenirs and keepsakes at fairs, exhibitions, Wild West shows, and other venues. Contemporary artists continue this tradition of beadwork today.

Dulcimer

L. O. Stapleton of Springdale made this dulcimer for his daughter Linda in 1980. He dubbed the style “Ozarkian Weeping Heart.”

“Stape,” as he was known to friends and family, made over 300 dulcimers, guitars, and other stringed instruments in the 1970s and 1980s out of his Springdale business, Hillbilly Dulcimer Shop.

Beaded Pincushion

Donated by Matha Ann (Mrs. Alfred) Lussky and Katherine Lussky Adam

This pincushion belonged to Alma Lussky of Fayetteville. She was the sister of Dr. Alfred Lussky, head of the German Department at the University of Arkansas for many years.The Lusskys were originally from Illinois by way of New York.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s members of the Mohawk, Tuscarora, and Mohegan tribes in upstate New York made pincushions like this and sold them as souvenirs to tourists visiting Niagara Falls and Saratoga.

Shuttle

Donated by Annabel Searcy

In the 1800s, before store-bought fabric became the norm, many a pioneer home had a loom where the woman of the house made the family fabrics. Shuttles like this handmade one carried yarns across warp threads, creating fabric.

Backwards “S” on the shuttle.

The shuttle most likely belonged to Temperance Caroline Searcy. (A backward “S” is punch-marked on the top of it.) Temperance, her husband Alfred H. Searcy, and their children came from Georgia to Arkansas in 1859, settling in the Friendship community east of Springdale where they farmed and raised hogs and sheep.

Temperance Searcy’s grandson, Lockwood, inherited his grandmother’s textile tools and other family heirlooms in the 1940s. Lockwood’s wife, Annabel Applegate Searcy, donated many of these pioneer era artifacts to the Shiloh Museum in 1968, the year the museum opened to the public.

Temperance Searcy’s grandson, Lockwood, inherited his grandmother’s textile tools and other family heirlooms in the 1940s. Lockwood’s wife, Annabel Applegate Searcy, donated many of these pioneer era artifacts to the Shiloh Museum in 1968, the year the museum opened to the public.